Bigbook_19 - TEST 19 < \ SECTION 1 Time—30 minutes...

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Unformatted text preview: TEST 19 < \ SECTION 1 Time—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks. each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. Because they had expected the spacecraft Voyager 2 5. The influence of the T [maeur among early philo- to be able to gather data only about the planets sophical thinkers was ----- --, if only because it was Jupiter and Saturn, scientists were -—-——- the wealth the sole dialogue ----- -- in Europe for almost of information it sent back from Neptune twelve 1,000 years. years after leaving Earth. ‘ (A) pervasive. .avaflablc (A) disappointed in (B) inestimable. .suppressed (B) concerned about (C) unnoteworthy. .abridged (C) confident in ' (D) underestimated. .studied (D) elated by - _ (E) circumscribed. .translated (E) anxious for 6. The Gibsons were little given to in any form; 2. Wearing the latest fashions was exclusively the not one of them was afraid of , of being and ----- -- of the wealthy until the l850’s, when mass seeming unlike their neighbors. production. aggressive entrepreneurs, and the ~ ~ . availability of the sewing machine made them :glglléiééafigfiégky """ " [he Huddle Class' (C) \ anger. confrontation (A) aspiration. .disagreeable to - (D) confom1ism..singularity (B) vexation. .superfluous for (E) ostentation. .eccentn'city (C) bane. .profitable to (D) prerogative. .accessible to 7 Even after a . . . . . --—-~ gamst the —-——-- of popular sover- (E) Obhgauon‘ 'popular wuh eignty were included. major figures in the human- , istic disciplines remained skeptical about the 3. Linguists have now confirmed what experienced proposal to extend suffrage to the masses. users of ASL—American Sign Language—have (A) recommendations continuation always implicitly known: ASL is a grammatically (B) sat-comma accséés ----- -- language in that it is capable of expressing (C) arguinents. introduction every possible syntactic relation. (D) provision; 'advamazcs (A) limited (E) laws. ,.creation _ (B) economical (C) complete (D) shifting (E) abstract 4. He was regarded by his follomrs as something of ‘ ' GO ON To THE NEXT PAGE ---—--—, not only because of his insistence on strict \ discipline, but also because of his ——-- adherence to formal details. (A) a martinet. .n'gid (B) an authority. .sporadic (C) a tyrant. .reluctant (D) a fraud. .conscientious. , (E) an acolyte. .maniacal 729 Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. 10. 11 FILING : METAL :: (A) jamb : door ' (B) ' sand 2 concrete (C) yeast: bread (D) shaving : wood (E) ashes : coal HOST : PARASITE :: (A) meadow: soil (B) egg: bird (C) medium: bacterium (D) lair: predator (E) kemelzseed SOLILOQUY : PLAY :: (A) yiplin : concerto (B) overturezmusical (C) duetcensemble (D) lyric : poem (E) aria : opera .. MEETING 1 MINUTES 12‘ v - (A) concert: orchestration (B) filter: camera (C) sale (D) earthquake: vibration ’ (E) television : signal CONTRACT : IMPLODE: (A) expand : swell (B) descend :plummet (C) addzaccelerate (D) cool : solidify (E) stretch : flex ‘16.. 730 13. APPRISE 2 INFORMATION :: 14. 15. (A) admonish :waming (B) defend 2 doubt (C) criticize : justification (D) comprehend : benefits (E) unite: whole _ MINU'I'IAE : DETAILS :1 (A) data:hypotheses (B) researchcfindings (C) approximations : calculations (D) queries : answers (E) quibbles:objections FRENETIC : MOVEMENT :: (A) perceptivezanalysis (B) et‘fonlesszexpression (C) focused2thought (D) spontaneous: behavior (E) fanaticalzbelief VENOM : TOXIN :: (A) bilezliver (B) vitamin:mineral (C) insulin:ng (D) milk 5 nutrient (E) clotzblood GO ON To THE NEXT PAGE. ill! 5) 0) 5) Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage. choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions folIOwing a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. Isadora Duncan's masterly writings on the dance reveal the depth of her determination to create a lyric form of the art which was free ofcharacterization, storytelling, and the theatrical exhibition of skills. She wished to discard the traditional methods and estab- lished vocabularies of such dance forms as ballet and to explore the internal sources of human expressiveness. She shunned bodily ornamentation and strove to use only the natural movements of her body, undistorted by acrobatic exaggeration and stimulated only by internal compulsion. In her recitals Duncan danced to the music of Beethoven. Wagner. and Gluck, among others, but, contrary to popular belief, she made no attempt to visu- alize or to interpret the music; rather, she simply reiied on it to provide the inspiration for expressing inner feel- ings thrOugh movement. She did not regard this use of music as ideal, however, believing that she would someday dispense with music entirely. That day never came. .- 17. The author is primarily concerned with Duncan’s (A) masterful lyricism as expressed in her writings on the dance (B) concerted efforts to Subdue the natural move- ments of the dance (C) belated recognition that she could not actually fulfill all of her ideals for the dance (D) basic standards for the dance form that she wished to create and perform (E) continuous responsiveness to a popular misconception about the nature of her new art form 18. The author implies that Duncan relied on music in her recitals in order to (A) interpret musical works solely by means of natural body movements (B) foster the illusion that music serves as an inspi- ration for the dance (C) inspire the expression of inner feeling when she danced (D) validate the public belief that music inspires the expression of feeling through movement (E) counter the public belief that she made no attempt to visualize music 731 20. 19. According to‘ the passage. Duncan intended to develop an art form that- would do all of the f0110wing EXCEPT (A) avoid the use of standard ballet techniques (B) revitalize an earlier established vocabulary (C) draw on internal sources of human expressive- ness (D) create intended effects without the use of acro- batic exaggeration ' ' (E) derive inspiration solely from inner feelings \ It can be inferred from the passage that which ‘of the following endeavors is LEAST compatible with Dunca'n’s ideals for the dance? (A) Using music to stimulate the inspiration to dance (B) Attempting to free an art form of both charac- terization and storytelling (C) Minimizing the theatrical exhibition of skills (D) Being inspired to express inner feeling through movement - (E) Creating a lyric art form by drawing on inner personal resources GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. ( \ ‘l‘he rccent,.apparently succassful, prediction by 21. The primary function of the passage as a whole mathematical models of an- appearance of El Nino— , is to ti}:- warm ocean current that periodically develops Line along the Pacific coast of South America—has excited (A) mtmducc a new uplanauon Ofa physwal , . ., . phenomenon -3: e w 7 ‘ . (5) ‘f‘iwhc‘h.’ ‘Idacob, fifrknc‘s pgtlfigigm ovgl‘o years (B) explain the difference between two related ago .ow Win 5 mtg crea e e1 norm y warm or physical phenomena . airs. erally cold water in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Nonetheless, until the development of the models no one could explain why conditions should regularly shift (10) from one to the other, as happens in the periodic oscil- lations between appearances of the warm El Nine and the cold so-called anti-El Nino. The answer, at least if the current model that links the behavior of the ocean (C) illustrate the limitations, of applying mathe- matics to complicated physical phenomena (D) indicate the direction that research_into a particular physical phenomenon should take (E) clarify the differences between an old explana- tion of a physical phenomenon and a new - — to that of the atmosphere is correct, is to be found in mOdCI Of It ()5) the ocean. . It has long been known that during an El Nifio, two 22. Which of the following best describes the organiza- conditions exist: (1) unusually warm water extends lion Of the first paragraph? along the eastern Pacific, principally along the coasts of Ecuador and Peru, and (2) winds blow from the west (20) into the warmer air rising over The warm water in the east. These winds tend to create a feedback mechanism explainc¢ , by driving the warmer surface water into a “pile” that ~ - . - blocks th’c'noml 993.6%an dEEE°L_‘P9Ld.}’@t¢I_.in _ ._. . Q.) , A 5252,1333?“ ."f’tcd and “s “we”. __ the—eastarid—fur—th—iér warms the eastern water, thus ‘ ' (25) strengthening the wind still more. The contribution of the model is to show that the winds of an El Nir'io, which raise sea level in the east, simultaneously send a (A) A theory is presented and criticized. V (B) A model is described and evaluated. (C) A result is reported and its importance (E) A hypothesis is introduced and contrary evidence presented. -- *sigrral'to’the west’lowering sea level. According to the 23' Amorditlg 1° the P355333, WhiCh 0f the fonowmg model, that signal is generated as a negative Rossby features ‘5 Charac‘c‘isuc of an El NifiO? (30) wave, a wave of depressed, or negative, sea level, that (A) Cold coastal water near pcm moves westward parallel to the equator at 25 to (B) Winds blowing from the west 85 kilometers per day. Taking months to traverse the (C) Random we“: Pacific, Rossby waves march to the western boundary (D) worldwidc effects 4' _ r "’ ' of the Pacific basin, which is modeled as a smooth wall (13) Short duration ' ” (35) but in reality consists of quite imgular island chains, such as the Philippines and Indonesia. ' When the waves meet the western boundary, they are reflected, and the model predicts that Rossby waves will be broken into numerous coastal Kelvin waves (40) carrying the same negative sea-level signal. These even- ' tually shoot toward the equator, and then head east- ' Go ON To THE_NEXT PAGE. ward along the equator propelled by the rotation of the Earth at a speed of about 250 kilometers per day. When enough Kelvin waves of sufficient amplitude arrive (45) from the western Pacific, their negative sea-level signal overcomes the feedback mechanism tending to raise the sea level, and they begin to drive the system into the opposite cold mode. This produces a gradual shift in. winds, one that will eventually send positive sea-level (50) Rossby waves westward, waves that will eventually return as cold cycle-ending positive Kelvin waves, beginning another warming cycle. 732 24': 25. “According to the model presented in the passage, which of the following normally signals the disap- pearance of an El Nino? (A) The arrival in the eastern Pacific of negative sea-level Kelvin waves (B) A shift in the direCtion of the winds produced ' by- the start of an anti-El Nifio elsewhere in the Pacific (C) The reflection of Kelvin waves after they reach the eastern boundary of the Pacific, along Ecuador and Peru (D) An increase in the speed at which negative Rossby waves cross the Pacific (E) The creation of a reservoir of colder, deep ocean water trapped under the pile of warmer, surface ocean water It can be inferred from the passage that which of the following would result fairly immediately from the cessation of the winds of an El Nino? I. Negative RosSby waves would cease to be generated in the eastern Pacific. II. The sea level in the eastern Pacific would fall. III. The surface water in the eastern Pacific would again be cooled by being mixed with deep water. - (A) I only (B) H only (C) I and II only (D) I and III only (E) i I, II, and III T33 26. Which of the following, iftrue, would most seri- 27. ously undermine the validity of the model of El Nifio that is presented in the passage? (A) During some years E1 Nifio extends signifi- cantly farther along the coasts of Ecuador and Peru than during other years. (B) During periods of unusually cool temperatures along the eastern Pacific, an El Nifio is much colder than normal. (C) The normal upwelling of cold water in the eastern Pacific depends much more on the local characteristics of the ocean than on atmospheric conditions. (D) The variations in the time it takes Rossby waves to cross the Pacific depend on the power of the winds that the waves encounter. ‘ (E) The western boundary of the Pacific basin is so irregular that it impedes most coastal Kelvin waves from beading eastward. The passage best supports the conclusion that during an anti~El Nifio the fastest-moving signal waves are (A) negative Rossby waves rnOVing east along the equator (B) positive Rossby waves moving west along the equator (C) negative Kelvin waves moving west along the equator (D) positive Kelvin waves moving west along the' equator (E) positive Kelvin waves moving east along the equator GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. " “—'3T._SPIZENDOR:-(A') _eirh"€sfn'e?s——(B)_'s§iialor Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since someioi' the duestions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, besure to consider all the choices before dedding which one is best. 28.sREPULSIONz (A) combination (B) elongation (C) attraction (D) oscillation (E) illumination 7 '25: ANALOGOUS: (A) resolving inconsistency (B) lacking similarity (C) repetitive (D) unremarkable (E) prudent ' '30. CEggATION: (A) involvement (B) union (C) commencement (D) invigoration (E) protection (C) depravity (D) greed (E) innovation 734 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. ‘ "—38.'SURFEIT:‘ (Ufarnis—h- "(3) WE ' DERIDE: (A) emulate (B) reward (C) condone (D) show respect for (E) extend favor to ' .SPARSE: (A) mild (D)'keen (E) rife (B) bent (C) vile 'I'IRADE: (A) lecture (B) digression (C) unplanned debate (D) modest request (E) dispassionate speech DIFFIDENT: (A) wise ' (B) bold (C) cruel (D) relaxed (E) Sloppy . SENTIENT: (A) abnormal (B) irregular (C) unconscious (D) irrelevant. (E) elemental ArrENUATE: (A) lighten (B) loosen (C) worsen (D) shorten (E) strengthen . (C) restrain (D) regulate (E) maintain SECTION 4 Time—-30 minutes 38 Questions Directions; Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneai il the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that l_:_es_t fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. - ._. ..drabrclothes.—~ l. Ix.) . Their A recent survey shows that, while ninety-four percent of companies conducting management- training programs open them to women, women are only seventy-four percent of those programs. (A) protesting against (B) participating in (C) displeased by (D) allowed in (E) refused by . Thomas Paine, whose political writing was often flamboyant, was in private life a surprisingly —— man: he lived in rented rooms, ate little, and wore (A) simple (B) controversial (C) sordid '(D)~ comfortable (E) discouneous of loyalties is first to oneself, next to kin, then to fellow tribe members, and finally to compa- tn'ots. (A) merging (B) hierarchy (C) definition (D) judgment (E) cognizance The belief that science destroys the arts appears to be supported by historical evidence that the arts have -—-—-—- Only when the sciences have been--—-. (A) declined. attacked (B) flourished. .neglected (C) matured. .unconcemed (D) succeeded. .developed (E) floundered. .constrained 748 5. The action and characters in a melodrama can be so immediately that all observers can hiss the villain with an air of smug but enjoyable . (A) spurned. .boredom (B) forgotten. .condesansion (C) classified. self-righteousness (D) plausible. .guilt (E) gripping. skepticism 6. In the design of medical experiments, the need for -— assignment of treatments to patients must be the difficulty of persuading patients to partici- pate in an experiment in which their treatment is decided by chance. (A) independent. .amended by (B) competent. emphasized by (C) mechanical. .controlled by (D) swift. .associated with (E) random. .reconciled with 7. Though dealers insist that professional art dealers can make money in the art market, even an knowledge is not enough: the art world is so fickle that stock—market prices are ---—- by comparison. (A) amateur’s. .sensible (B) expert’s. .erratic (C) investor’s. .booming (D) insider’s. .predictable (E) artist's..irrational GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. 10. ll. 12. EXERCISE 2 STRONG 2: (A) perform 2 shy ' :2 ' (B) watch: alert (C) decidezastute (D) drink: thirsty (E) read : knowledgeable COWARD : BRAVE 2: (A) hero 2 cynical (B) martyr2impatient (C) philanthropist :selfish (D) agnostic 2 intuitive (E) traitor 2 careful CREDITS : MOVIE :: (A) bylinezartjcle (B) copyrightzsong (C) rehearsalzdance (D) dedication: book (E) title2work, COMPENDIUM 2 SUMMARY :: (A) anthologyzcollection (B) encyclopedia : knowledge (C) dissertationzcollaboration (D) brochurezsolicitation' (E) preciszparagraph' V COHABI'I‘ : RESIDE :: (A) conspirezplot (B) coincide 2 contradict (C) secrete 2 conceal (D) infiltrate1irtfluence (E) frame: incriminate 749 \’ '\ l3. CACOPHONY 2 SOUND 2: 14. 15. 16. (A) crescendo : music (B) friction 2 heat (C) ripple ; liquid (D) glarezlight (E) meterzmeasurement STRATAGEM 2 DECEIVE 2: (A) epithetzcorrespond (B) omtion:publish (C) conservadonzexpcnd (D) concession : placate (E) sentencezprosecute SPECIOUS 2 GENUINENESS 2: (A) illusory': reality v (B) impulsiverpurposefulness (C) precipitate : speeds; ' (D) cunning : duplicity (E) imaginary 2 mind DECLAMATION 2 GRANDILOQUENCE ::/ (A) exclamationzimportanoe' (B) proclamationzconsent ' (C) diatribe:abuse _ (D) questionzinsistence‘ (E) provocationzbetrayal GO ON TO mam PAGE. Directions; Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. - Historians have only recently begun to note the . (50) reality of a consumer society without a heavy industrial increase in demand for luxury goods and services that sector. _ ‘ l ' , ' took place in eighteenth-century England. McKeudrick That future exploration of these‘key questions is u", has explored the Wedgwood fimi’s remarkable success undoubtedly necessary should not, however, diminish (5) in marketing luxury pottery; Plumb haswritten about the force of the conclusion of recent studies: the insa- the proliferation of provincial theaters, musical festivals, (55). tiable demand in eighteenth-century England for and children’s toys and books. While the fact of this frivolous as well as useful goods and services fore- consumer revolution is hardly in doubt, three key ques- shadows our own world. tions remain: Who were the consumers? What were (10) their’motives? And what were the effects of the new demand for luxuries? An answer to the first of these has been difficult to 17. In the firstparagraph, the author mentions McKendrick and Plumb most probably in order to obtain. Although it has been possible to infer from the (A) contrast their views on the subject of luxury goods, andrservices actually produced what manufac- consumerism in eighteenthccenmry England (15) turers and servicing trades thought their customers (3) indium the inadeqmcy of historiographical wanted, only a study of relevant personal documents approaches to eighteenth-century English written by actual consumers will provide a precise history ~ picture of who wanted what. We still need to know how (C) give examples of historians who have helped to _l_arge_thr} commmarketjwasandhowiardownthe... _- - «e r——»¢Stabli5h~th¢-fact-of—gtowmgconsumerism in- 7—— Iéb)" social scale the consumer demand for luxury goods eighteenth-century England penetrated..With regard to this last question, we might (D) Support the contention that key questions about note in passing that Thompson, while rightly restoring eighteenth-century consumerism remain to be - laboring people to the stage ofeighteenth-century _ ‘ . answeretl~~____ V,» A ___, ,,_ ___,_V 7, _, English historyfha's Wably' the opfiésfti'on (E) Compare one historian’s interest in luxury goods '25) of these people to the inroads of capitalist consumerism such as pattery to another historian‘s interest in general; for example, laboring people in eighteenth- in luxury services such as musical festivals century England readily shifted from home-brewed beer .10 standardqu be.“ “0de by huge’ mwly capnal' 18. Which of the following items, if preserved-from rzed urban breweries. eighteenth-century England, would provide an '30) To answer the question of why consumers became so amp}: of the kind of documens mentioned in eager to buy, some historians have pointed to the ability , lines 1647 ? . _ of manufacturers to advertisein a relatively uncensored press. This, however, hardly scents a sufficient answer. (A) A Mme.“ afirccmmt bl?le a supplier 0f 1’ 3W McKendrick favors a Veblen model of conspicuous materials and a supplier Ofluxury g°°d5 35) consumption stimulated by competition for status. The (B) A diary that mentions luxury EOOdS and “middling sort“ bought goods and services because, they “Me‘s thased by is 3113101 . , wanted to follow fashions set by the rich. Again, we may ‘ (C) Ari-heater liCkct Stamped with the date and wonder whether this explanation is sufficient. Do not _ namc 0f 3 Particum Play people enjoy buying things as a form of self-gratification? (D) A Payron record from a Company that 40) If so, consumerism could be seen as a product of the rise PYOdUCCd luxury EOOdS 511611 3-5 POHCTY of new concepts of individualism and materialism, but (E) A newspaper advertisement describing luxury not necessarily of the frenzy for conspicious competition. g°°d$ and SCfVlCCS aVailablc at a Seaside Finally, what were the cOnsequences of this consumer 115011 ' demand for luxuries? McKendrick claims that it goes a 45) long way toward explaining the coming of the Industrial Revolution. But does it? What, for example, does the production of high-quality pottery and toys have to do with the development of iron manufacture or textile mills? It is perfectly possible to have the psychology and GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. v 750 19. According to the passage, Thompson attributes to laboring people in eighteenth-century England which of the following attitudes toward capitalist consumerism? (A) Enthusiasm (B) Curiosity (C) Ambivalence (D) Stubbomness (E) Hostility .20. In the third paragraph, the author is primarily concerned with (A) contrasting two theses and offering a compro- misc (8) questioning two explanations and proposing a possible alternative to them (C) paraphrasing the work of two historians and questioning their assumptions (D) examining two theories and endorsing one over ' the other (E) raising several questions but implying that they cannot be answered 21. According to the passage, a Veblen model of conspicuous consumption has been used to (A) investigate the extent of the demand for luxury goods among social classes in eighteenth- century England I“ (B) classify the kinds of luxury goods desired by eighteenth-century consumers (C) explain the motivation of eighteenth-century consumers to buy luxury goods (D) establish the extent to which the tastes of rich consumers were shaped by the middle classes in eighteenthcentury England (E) compare luxury consumerism in eighteenth- century England with such consumerism in the twentieth century 751 ( x 22. According to the passage, eighteenth-century England and the contemporary world of the passage’s readers are ' (A) dissimilar in the extent to which luxury consumerism could be said to be widespread among the social classes (B) dissimilar in their definitions of luxury goods) and services (C) dissimilar in the extent to which luxury goods could be said to be a stimulant of industrial development . (D) similar in their strong demandfor a variety of goods and services (E) similar in the extent to which a middle class could be identified as imitating the habits of a wealthier class . It can be inferred from the passage that the author would most probably agree with which of the following statements about the relationship between the Industrial Revolution and the demand for luxury goods and services in eighteenth-<xntury England? (A) The growing demand for luxury goods and services was a major factor in the coming of the Industrial Revolution. (3) ‘The Industrial Revolution exploited the already existing demand for luxury goods and services. (C) Although the demand for luxury goods‘may have helped bring about the Industrial Revo- lution, the demand for luxury services did, not. (D) There is no reason to believe that the. Industrial Revolution was directly driven by a growing demandfor luxury goods and services. - (E) The increasing demand for luxury goods and - services was a cultural phenomenon that has been conclusively demonstrated to have been separate from the coming of the Industrial Revolution. * ‘ v '- GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Um (5) (10) (I5) Researchers are finding that in many ways an indi- vidual bacterium is more analogous to a component cell of a multicellular organism than it is to a free-living, autonomous organism. Anabaena, a freshwater bacteria, is acase in point Among phorosynthetic baCteria, Anabaena is unusual: it is capable of both photosyn- thesis and nitrbgen fixation. Within a single cell, these two biochemical processes are incompatible: oxygen, prodqu during photosynthesis, inactivates the nitroge- nase required for nitrogen fixation. In Anabaena communities, however, these prousses can coexist. When fixed nitrogen compounds are abundant, Anabaena is strictly photosynthetic and its cells are all alike. When nitrogen levels are low, however, specialized cells called heterocysts are produced which lack chloro- phyll (necessary for photosynthesis) but which can fix nitrogen by converting nitrogen gas into a usable form. Submicroscopic channels deveIOp which connect the heterocyst cells with the'photosynthetic ones and which are used for transferring cellular products between the, two kinds of Anabaena cells: ' ' ‘ - 24- Anagrams.passagewhichntthefouomg_ statements is true of bacteria that engage in photo- synthesis? ' ' (A) They eventually become two autonomous cells. ,_(B)._They cannot normally also engage in nitrogen fixation. (C) Oxygen normally inactivates them. (D) Cellular products are constantly transferred between such-bacteria. (E) .They normally lack chlorophyll. _ 25. It can be inferred from the passage that cell differen- tiation within Anabaena is regulated by the (A) amount of oxygen.Anabaena cells produce (B) season of the year H (C) amount of fixed nitrogen compounds available (D) number of microscopic [channels uniting Anabaena cells (E) amount of chlorophyll in Anabaena cells 752 C a 26. The passage supports which of the following infer- ences about heterocysts? (A) Heterocysts do not produce oxygen. (B) Nitrogen gas inactivates heterocysts. (C) Chlorophyll increases the productivity of het- erocysts. (D) Heterocysts allow nitrogen fixation and photo- synthesis to occur in the same cell. (E) Heterocysts are more important for Anabaena': functioning than are photosynthetic cells. . The author uses the example of Anabaena to illus- trate the (A) uniqueness of bacteria among unicellular organ- 151115 (B) inadequacy of an existing view of bacteria (C) ability of unicellular organisms to engagein photosynthesis . . ' (D) variability of a freshwater bacteria ' (E) difficulty of investigating even the simplest unicellular organisms GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. DILUTE: (A) fill (B) affirm (C) install (D) agitate (E) concentrate- 29. FERVOR: (A) discontent (B) testimony (C) apathy (D) outrage (E) impertinence (B) insult (E) masticate 30. EMACIATE: (A) lengthen (C) soothe (D) fatten BOMBASTIC: (A) understated (B) unimpressive (C) derivative (D) enigmatic (E) complex 31. occurr; (A) informal (B) innocuous (C) hypocritical (D) gradually refined (E) readily fathomable 32. 1'. 38. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. V753- ‘ \ TACIT: (A) determined (3) illicit (C) discrete (D) necessary (E) explicit DESICCATE: (A) add fertilizer to (B) add water to (C) cement (D) suspend (E) homogenize CHICANERYQXA) honest opinion (B) sound investment (C) unfashionable item (D) aboveboard action (E) intricate plan DISAFFECT; (A) win over (B) fail to proceed (C) cause to improve (D) include (E) reinstate CASTIGATION: (A) affection I, (B) solicitousness (C) sincerity (D) commitment (E) approbation SINECURE: (A) optimistic forecast (B) voluntary restriction (C) unwelcome news (D) arduous employment (E) overdue assistance FOR GENERAL TEST 19 ONLY Answer Key and Percentages' of Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly VEHIAL‘ADIUTY QUANTITATIVE ABIUTY ANALYTICAL AIILI‘I'Y mm mm .55!— II mm mm m mm mm n 1 D 1 B 90 1 A 86 1 B 80 1 z A 75 1 c 79 2 D 2 A 93 C 72 2 B 76 2 D 77 a 3 C 93 3 B 93 B 74 3 A 75 a C 68 c 4 A 78 4 B 86 A 71 4 C 75 4 D 51 E 5 A 73 5 C 60 A 66 5 D 73 5 D 35 A 6 D 67 6 E 72 A 65 6 A 67 6 D 53 E 7 B 44 7 D’ 61 B 46 7 C 61 7 A 72 D 8 D 87 8 E 95 D 63 8 D 59 8 B 68 B 9 C 70 9 C 75 D 74 9 C 49 9 C ‘44 A 10 A E 55 10 A 62 C 56 10 B / 51 10 E 54 D 11 C 11 A 45 D 45 11 A 46 C A 12 B 12 A 61 B 40 12 D 34 A c 13 A 13 D 51 D 29 13 B 42 E D 14 E 14 D 51 B 50 14 A 47 A a 15 E 15 A 38 C 27 15 B 38 A E 16 D 16 C 26 C 92 16 C 87 B B 17 D 17 C' 75 B ' 83 17 D 39 C B 18 C 18 B 85 A 77 16 B 79 E c 19 B 19 E- 36 E 61 19 C 66 A c 20 A 20 B 42 D 61 20 A 73 C B 21 A 64 21 C 76 D 86 21 B 67 E D 22 C 38 22 D 60 B 72 22 E 71 A a 23 B 85 23 D 53 B 66 23 D 55 B' E 24 A 42 24 B 70 D 42 24 D 35 A C 25 E 26 25 C 73 A 38 25 A 38 E D 26 E 24 26 A a D 55 26 B 63 27 E Z! 27 B 28 A ‘ 42 27 ‘ D 29 28 C 93 28 E 92 C 55 26 D 28 29 B 86 29 C 80 E 39 29 A 31 30 C 66 30 D 65 D 30 30 E 25 31 B 55 31 A 54 32 D 49 32 E 46 33 E 55 33 E 44- 34 E 51 34.1 B 54 35 B‘ 44 35 D 36 36 C 44 36 A 37 37 E Z! 37 E 26 38 A 21 38 D 15 'Esu‘rnated P+ for the group of examinees Mao took the GEE Gumal Test in a recent trims-year period. l 767 ...
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Bigbook_19 - TEST 19 &amp;lt; \ SECTION 1 Time—30 minutes...

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