Bigbook_20 - Time —. 30 minutes : 38 Questions...

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Unformatted text preview: Time —. 30 minutes : 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, 5. Some customs travel well; often, however, behavior each blank indicating that something has been omitted. /- that is considered the epitome of _at.hc')me is -Begmth the sentence are five lettered words or sets of . perceived as impossibly rude or, at_the least, harm- Choose the word-or set of words for each blank lessly bizarre abroad. - - ' fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. (A) novelty (B) eccentricity (C) urbanin (D) coarseness (E) tolerance 3. Although economists have traditionally considered the distnict to be solely an agricultural one, the -—-—- - of the inhabitants' occupations makes such a classi- ‘ fication obsolete. 6. The of the early Greek philosophers’ attempts to explain the operations of the cosmos led certain later thinkers to inquire into the of human (A) productivity (B) diversity (C) predictability reason. (D) profitability (E) stability (A) difficulty. .0figin r ~~ --— -» » w r * (B) meaning. .supremacy 2. ' The authOr of this book overlooks or (C) complexity. .reality some-of the problems and shortcomings in otherwise (D) equivocations. .subtlety highly successful foreign industries in order to (E) failures. .efficacy “the points on whichthey excel and on which we might ' - try “5 emulate them‘ 7. Ever prey to vagrant impulses that impelled‘him to (A) accidentally. .exaggerate , his talents on a host of unworthy projects, his (B) purposely; .emphasize " very nonetheless enhanced his reputation,,for (C) occasionally. .counterbalance the sheer energy of his extravagance dazzled ~~————-(-'B)-intentionaily:~.confuse—-—~~—~ —- — r—-—-~—--~~-~~.~ mobseWcrs. —-—- ——--__—_-.- 7.. .__. .-__.-___.- .. __ '53-? (E) Cleverly' ‘compound (A) undermine. .enthusiasm (B) isolate. .selectiveness 3. Crosby’s colleagues have never learned, at least not (C) display. .affability "“" 'in‘time to avoid'embarrassing themselves, that her (D) SQuander. .dissipation .. occasional ---- air of befuddlement a display - (E) implicate. . genius of her formidable intelligence. (A) genuine. .dominates (B) alert. .contradicts (C) acute. .precludes (D) bogus. .presages (E) painstaking. .succeeds ,.~,.., 7 _ 4. 4. To ensure the development. and exploitation of a new technology, there must be a constant of several . nevertheless disfinct activities. a GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. (A)-‘inter‘play (1i) implementation (C)‘comprehending _, (D) improvement (E)' exploration 782 Directions: In each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. 10. ll. 12. MULTIPLY': DlVIDE :2 (A) enumerate : count (B) speak :,communicate (C) enter: leave (D) drive: ride (E) computezestimate RECLUSE : WITHDRAWN :2 (A) isolationist 2 unreserved (B) pacifist : aggressive (C) miser : liberal (D)- bigot : biased ' (E) procrastinator: unmanageable CURATOR : ART :2 (A) functionary : administration (B) archivist2documents (C) referee: laws (D) physician: research (E) raconteurzstories . ABACUS : CALCULATE :2 (A) organ : worship (B) pate_nt:invent (C) calipers:regulate (D) manuscript : edit (E) sextant:navigate STRAY : GROUP :2 (A) miscalculatezsolution (B) improvise :. suggestion (C)'slur:pronunciation' - (D) deletezchange (E) digress: subject - .783 13. l4. l6. ESCAPE : CAPTURE :2 (A) wamtdanger ‘ (B) immerse 2 dampness (C) feint2thrust (D) dodge:blow (E) invest: bankruptcy LEVEE : RIVER 2: (A) seamzfabric (B) corona:suri (C) cordon2crowd (D) petal : flower (E) moat“: castle . MERCURIAL 2 MOOD :: (A) energetic2delirium (B) j0vial:conviviality (C) fickle:affection - (D) martial:anarchy (E) paranoidzsuspicion ENUNCIATE : WORDS :2 (A) limnzlines (B) parsezsentenoes (C) hear:sounds (D) runzsteps (E) stint:savings ' GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Line (5) (10) (15) ‘ x Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose the best answer-to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. A serious critic has to comprehend the particular content, unique chture, and special meaning of a work of art. And here she faces a dilemma. The critic must recognize the artistic element of uniqueness that requires subjective reaction; yet she must not be unduly prejudiced by such reactions. Her likes and dislikes are less important than what the work itself communicates, and her preferences may blind her to certain qualities of the work and thereby prevent an adequate under- standing of it. Hence, it is necessary that a critic develop a sensibility informed by familiarity with the history of art and aesthetic theory. On the other hand, his insuffi- cient to treat the artwork solely historically, in relation to a fixed set of ideas or values. The critic’s knowledge and training are, rather, a preparation of the cognitive and emotional abilities needed for an adequate personal response to an artwork's own particular qualities. 17. According to the author, a serious art critic may avoid being prejudiced by her subjective reactions if she (A) treats an artwork in relation to a fixed set of ideas and values ‘ (B) brings to her observation a knowledge of art history and aesthetic theory (C) allows more time for the observation of each artwork ‘ (D) takes into account the preferences of other art critics - (E) limits herself to that art with which she has adequate familiarity 784 18. '19. 20. The author implies that it is insufficient to treat a work of art solely historically because (A) doing so would lead'thecritic into a dilemma (B) doing so can blind the critic to some of the artwork’s unique qualities (C) doing so can insulate the‘critic from personally held beliefs (D) Subjective reactions can produce a biaSed response (E) critics are not sufficiently familiar with art history ' The passage suggests that the author would be most likely to agree with which of the following statements? ‘ a (A) Art speaks to the passions as well as to the ifit’elléEt'.‘ ‘ "" q ‘ " ' (B) Most works of an express unconscious wishes or desires. . (C) The best an is accessible to the greatest number . of people. “ . (D) The art produced in the last few decades is of inferior quality. (E) The meaning of art is a function of the social conditions in which it was produced. The author’s argument is developed primarily by the use of ' ' (A) an attack on sentimentality (B) an example of successful art criticism (C) a critique of artists’ training (D) a warning against extremes in art criticism (E) an analogy between art criticism and an production GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Lin? 5} l0) [5) .70) ’5) .0) 5) 0) U Viruses. infectious particles consisting of nucleic acid packaged in a protein coat (the capsid), are diff- Cult to resist. Unable to reproduce outside a living cell. viruses reproduce only by subverting the genetic mecha- nisms ofa host cell. in one kind of viral life cycle, the virus first binds to the cell’s surface, then penetrates the cell and sheds its capsid. The'exposed viral nucleic acid produces new viruses from the contents of the cell. Finally. the cell releases the viral progeny, and a new cell cycle of infection begins. The human body responds to a viral infection by producing antibodies; complex, highly specific proteins that selectively bind to foreign molecules such as viruses. An antibody can either inter- fere with a virus‘ ability to bind to a cell, or can prevent it from releasing its nucleic acid. Unfortunately, the common cold, produced most 42- often by rhinoviruses, is intractable to antiviral defense. Humans have difficulty resisting colds because rhi- noviruses are so diverse, including at least 100 strains. The strains differ most in the molecular structure of the proteins in their capsids. Since disease-fighting anti- bodies bind to the capsid, an antibody developed to protect against one rhinovirus strain is useless against other strains. Different antibodies must be produced for each strain. A defense against rhinoviruses might nonetheless succeed by exploiting hidden similarities among the rhi- 4 novirus strains. For example, most rhinovirus strains ' bind to the same kind of molecule (delta-receptors) on a cell‘s surface when they attack human cells. Colonno, taking advantage of these common receptors, devised a strategy for blocking the attachment of rhinoviruses to their appropriate receptors. Rather than fruitlessly searching for an antibody that would bind to all rhi- noviruses, Colonno realized that an antibody binding to the common receptors of a human cell would prevent rhinoviruses from initiating an infection. Because human cells normally do not develop antibodies to compo- nents of their own cells, Colonno injected human cells into mice, which did produce an antibody to the , common receptor. In isolated human cells, this anti- body proved to be extraordinarily effective at thwarting the rhinovirus. Moreover, when the antibody was given to chimpanzees, it inhibited rhin0viral growth, and in humans it lessened both the severity and duration of cold symptoms. ' ‘ Another possible defense against rhinoviruses was proposed by Rossman, who described rhinovi- ruses’ detailed molecular structure. Rossman showed that protein sequences common to all rhinovirus strains lie at the base of a deep “canyon” scoring each fac: of the capsid. The narrow opening of this canyon possibly preVents the relatively large antibody molecules from‘ binding to the common sequence, but smaller molecules might reach it. Among these smaller, nonantibody molecules, some might bind to the common sequence, lock the nucleic acid in its coat, and thereby prevent the virus from reproducing. _ i ‘ 785- 21. 24. The primary purpose of , the passage is to (A) discuss viral mechanisms and possible ways of circumventing certain kinds of those mecha- msms (B) challenge recent research on how rhinoviruses bind to receptors on the surfaces of cells (C) suggest future research on rhinoviral growth in chimpanzees (D) defend a controversial research program whose purpose is to discover the molecular structure of rhinovirus capsids (E) evaluate a dispute between advocates of two theories about the rhinovirus life cycle It can be inferred from the passage that‘the protein sequences of the capsid that vary most among strains of rhinovirus are those ‘ (A) at the base of the “canyon” (B) outside of the “canyon” (C) responsible for producing nucleic acid (D) responsible for preventing the formation of delta-receptors (E) preventing the capsid from releasing is nucleic acid . It can be inferred from the passage that a cell lacking delta-receptors will be (A) unable to prevent_the rhinoviral nucleic acid from shedding its capsid (B) defenseless against most strains of rhinovirus (C) unable to release the viral progeny it develops after infection (D) protected from new infections by antibodies to the rhinovirus (E) resistant to infection by most strains of rhin0virus Which of the following research strategies for devel- oping a defense against the common cold would the author be likely to find most promising? (A) Continuing to look for a general antirhinovirak- antibody ' a . (B) Seai‘ching for common cell-surface receptors in humans and mice . (C) Continuing to look for similarities among the various strains of rhinovinrs (D) Discovering how the human body produces antibodies in response to a rhinoviral infec- tion (E) Determining the detailed molecular structure of the nucleic acid of a rhinovirus GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 25 26. . It can be inferred from the passage that the purpose of Colonno’s experiments was to determine whether (A) chimpanzees and humans can both be'infccted by rhinoviruses ' (B) chimpanzees can produce antibodies to human cell-surface reaptors V - , (C) a rhinovirus’ nucleic acid might be locked in its protein coat (D) binding antibodies to common receptors could produce a possible defense against rhinoviruses ' (E) rhinoviruses are vulnerable to human anti- bodies - ' According to the passage, Rossman’s research suggests that (A)-a defense against rhinoviruses might exploit structural similarities among the strains of rhinovirus__- , , ' -. (B) human cells normally do notdevelop antibodies to components of their own cells ' ability to bind to the surface of a host cell (D) rhinovirus versatility can work to the benefit of researchers trying to find a useful antibody " (E) Colonno's research findings are probably invalid .321- .. 786 ‘ \ 27. According to the passage, in order for_a given anti-.. body to bind to a given rhinoviral capsid, which of the following must be true?l ' . ' - a (A) The capsid must- have a deep “canyon” on each ' of its faces. (B) The antibody must-be specific to the molecular structure of the particular capsid. (C) The capsid must separate from its nucleic acid ' before binding to an antibody. (D) The antibody must bind to a particular cell- surface receptor before it can bind to a rhinovirus. . (E) The antibody must first enter a cell containing the particular rhinovirus. _ _ i_—_—-—.— . . .— -. ———-~—-«—r-—~——--—-~—-GOON—TO-Tl-IE—NEX:FPAGET~- “ (C) the various strains of rhrnovrrus differ" in their Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. DOMINANT: (A) defective (B) multiple (C) inferred (D) shifting (E) recessive (B) simplify (E) understand 29. DISPUTE: (A) accept (C) frustrate (D) silence PERJURY: (A) truthful deposition (B) vivid recollection (C) voluntary testimony (D) inadvertent disclosure ' (E) inexplicable fabrication 30. (B) hysteria (E) cultivation DORMANCY: (A) momentum (C) availability (D) activity 31. 787 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37. 38. ‘ x PLETHORA: (A) deterioration (B) embellishment (C) scarcity (D) vacillation (E) afi'umation STOCK; (A) unique (B) unfounded (C) desirable (D) unhealthy (E) trustwoth BURGEON: (A) retreat (C) wither (D) sever (B) evolve (E) minimize OCCULT: (A) foresee (B) bare (C) assert (D) transform (E) presume NASCENT: (A) widely displaced . (B‘) 'completely clear (C). totally natural (D) strongly contrary (E) fully established AMPLI'FY: (A) condemn (a) disburse (C) dccrpher (D) garble (E) abridge EXTENUATI'NG: (A) opposing (B) severe (C) intractable >(D) aggravating (E) internal QLbLAUJ.‘ U Time— 30 minutes . 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that E fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. Given the existence of so many factions in the field, it was unrealistic of 'Anna Freud toexpect any of opinion. (A) freedom (D) expression .(B) reassessment (E) formation (C) uniformity 2. Although specific concerns may determine the intent of a research project, its results are often (B) beneficial (E) specialized (A): unanticipated (C) expensive 7 (D) spectacular» ' 3. To list Reilly’s achievements in a fragmentary way is -—-, for it distracts our attention from the ----—~ themes of her work. (A) unproductive. .disparate (B) misleading. .integrating (C) pragmatic. .comprehensive , (D) logical.,.important (E) inevitable. .unsettling 4. People frequently denigrate books about recent catastrophes as morally attempts to profit from misfortune, but in my view our desire for such books, together with the venerable tradition to which they belong, them. (A) inopportune. .encourages (B) fortuitous. .fosters (C) treacherous.,.safeguards (D) despicable. .legitimizes (E) corrupte. generates 800 ‘ x 5.. That many of the important laws of science were discovered during experiments designed to ---—- ‘ other phenomena suggests that experimental results are the of planning. of inevitable natural forces rather than (A) analyze. .foundations (B) disprove. .predecessors (C) alter. .adjuncts (D) illuminate. .consequence (E) verify. .essence . Although in eighteenth-century England an active cultural life accompanied the beginnings of middle- class consumerism, the ———- of literacy was ———- with the rise of such consumerism in the different areas ,of the country. ' (A) repudiation. .reconciled (B) renewal..inconsistent (C) promotion. .combined (D) spread. .compatible (E) degree. .uncorrelated . The trainees were given copies of a finished manual to see whether they could themselves begin to -—-—- the inflexible, though tacit, rules for composing more of such instructional materials. (A) design (B) revise (C) disrupt (D) standardize (E) derive GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: In each of the foll0wing questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases; Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. BUTTER : MARGARINE :: (A) sugar: saccharin (B) porcelain : tile (C) photograph : painting (D) music: tape (E) signal : whistle 9. MUTED : COLOR :: (A) archaic : diction (B) pastoral : composition (C) muffled : sound (D) haunting : tune (E) unconcerned : interest 10. MUFFLER : NECK :: (A) sandal : foot (B) collar: blouse (C) earring : ear (D) mitten: hand (E) suspendersztrouSers ll. PLANT: SOIL :: .. (A) . germ : bacteria- 4- (B) organismzmedium (C) sample: growth (D) nutrientzliquid (E) tree:root 12. POTTERY:SHARD :: (A) symphony: musician (B) bread : crumb ' (C) wall : bn'ck (D) shoe 2 heel (E) building:architect 801 l3. I4. 16. PURIFICATION : DRQSS :: (A) distillation : vinegar (B) assayzgold (C) desalinization:salt (D) condensation : vapor (E) reaction:catalyst DISGUISE : RECOGNITION :: (A) prevarication : statement (B) infidelity : marriage (C) camouflage: infiltration (D) espionagerdiplomacy (E) paddingzdamage . GUST :' WIND :2 (A) rapids: river (B) blizzardzsnowstorm (C) cloudburstzrainfall (D) mist: fog (E) surf: sea DISABUSE : ERROR :: (A) rehabilitate: addiction (B) perseverezdereliction (C) belittle:imperfection (D) discredit:reputation (E) discernzdiscrimination GOON TO . .. —.~~ ‘..--'. .r..—-. ,. _. a. . TH E NEXT PAGE. » V S.» Air-1. \-' .‘, ( \ Directions: Each passage in this group is f0110wed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied in that passage. I ‘ - Diamonds, an occasional component of rare igneous- rocks called lamproites and kimberlitcs, have never been dated satisfactorily. However, some diamonds contain an, minute inclusions of silicate minerals, commonly olivine, (5) pyroxene, and garnet. These minerals can be dated by radioactive decay techniques because of the very small quantities of radioactive trace elements they, in turn, contain. Usually, it is possible to conclude that the inclu- sions are older than their diamond hosts, but with little (10) indication of the time interval involved. Sometimes, however,-the crystal form of the silicate inclusions is observed to resemble more closely the internal structure of diamond than that of otheL silicate mineralsLIt is not I known how rare this resemblance is, or whether it is (15) most often seen in inclusions of silicates such as garnet, whose crystallography is generally somewhat similar to that of diamond; but when present, the resemblance is regarded as compefl'ngividencethat the diamond5__and n 18. According to the passage, the age of silicate minerals included in' diamonds can be determined due to a feature of the r (A) trace elements in the diamond hosts (B) trace elements in the rock surrounding the diamonds v (C) trace elements in the silicate minerals (D) silicate minerals’ crystal structure (E) host diamonds’ crystal structure 19. The author states that which of the following generally has a crystal structure sirriilar to that of diamond? (A) Lamproite (B) Kimberlite (C) Olivine ‘ (D) Pyroxene (E) Garnet inclusions are truly cogenetic. ’WZDTH'IheVmain pufisbse B'r'ihe‘fiEs’a‘g'e'is‘ib ‘ > (A) explain why it has not been possible to deter- mine the age of diamonds r __. M _ (B) explain how it might be possible to date some ' d‘ 'd . ‘ (A) with small diamonds inside of them mm" 5 17. The author implies that silicate inclusions were most often formed .. -W— «vow—um (B) with trace elements derived from their host minerals (C) by the radioactive decay of rare igneous rocks (D) at an earlier period than were their host minerals (E) from the crystallization of rare igneous material 802 (C) compare two alternative approaches to deter- mining the age of diamonds ' (D) compare a method of dating diamonds with a method used to date certain silicateirninerals (E) compare the age of diamonds with that of certain silicate minerals contained within them GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. riti Wm . .o. in“ Liver. r. - ‘rluurrmw inc 5 i 0} 0) ’U 7} )) Discussion of the assimilation of Puerto Ricans in the United States has focused on two factors: social standing and the loss of national culture. In general, excessive stress is placed on one factor or the other, depending on whether the commentator is North American or Puerto Rican. Many North American social-scientists, such as Oscar Handlin, Joseph Fitz- patrick. and Oscar Lewis. consider Puerto Ricans as the most recent in a long line of ethnic entrants to occupy the lowest rung on the social ladder. Such a “sociodemographic” approach tends to regard assimila- tion as a benign process, taking for granted increased economic advantage and inevitable cultural integration. in a supposedly egalitarian context. However, this approach fails to take into account the colonial nature of the Puerto Rican case. with this group, unlike their European predecessors, coming from a nation politically subordinated to the United States. Even the '_‘radical" critiques of this mainstream research model, such as the critique developed in Divided Society, attach the issue ' of ethnic assimilation too mechanically to factors of economic and social mobility and are thus unable to illuminate the cultural subordination of Puerto Ricans as a colonial minority. In contrast, the “colonialist” approach of island- based writers such as Eduardo Seda-Bonilla, Manuel ' Maldonado-Denis, and Luis Nieves-Falcon tends to view assimilation as the famed loss of national culture in an unequal contest with imposed foreign values. There is, of course, a strOng tradition of cultural accom- modation among other Puerto Rican thinkers. The writings of Eugenio Fernandez Mendez clearly exemplify this tradition, and many'supporters of Puerto Rico‘s commonwealth status share the same universalizing orientation. But the Puerto RiCan intellectuals who have written most about the assimilation process in the United States all advance cultural nationalist views, advocating the preservation of minority cultural distinc- tions and rejecting what they see as the subjugation of colonial nationalities. . This cultural and political emphasis is appropriate, but the colonialist-thinkers misdirect it, overlooking the class relations at work in both Puerto Rican and North American history. They pose the clash of national cultures as an absolute polarity, with each culture under- , stood as static and undifferentiated. Yet both the Puerto Rican and North American traditions have been subject ' to constant challenge from cultural forces within their own societies, forces that may move toward each other in ways that cannot be written off as mere “assimila- tion." Consider, for example, the indigenous and Afro- Caribbean traditions in Puerto Rican culture and how they influence and are influenced by other Caribbean cultures and Black cultures in the United States. The elements of coercion and inequality, so central to cultural contact according to the colonialistl framework, play no role in. this kind of convergence of racially and ethnically different elements of the same social class. 803 21. 22. The author’s main purpOSe is to (A) criticize the emphasis on social standing in discussions of the assimilation of Puerto Ricans in the United States (B) support the thesis that assimilation has not been a benign process for Puerto Ricans (C) defend a view of the assimilation of Puerto Ricans that emphasizes the preservation of national culture ' (D) indicate deficiencies in two schools of thought on the assimilation of Puerto Ricans in the United States (E) reject the attempt to formulate a general frame- work for discussion of the assimilation of Puerto Ricans in the United States According to the passage, cultural accommodation is promoted by (A) Eduardo Seda-Bonilla (B) Manuel Maldonado-Denis (C) the author of Divided Society _ (D) the majority of social scientists writing on irnmi- gration (E) many supporters of Puerto-Rico‘s common- wealth status ‘ . It can be inferred from the passage that a writer such as Eugenio Fernandez Mendez would most likely agree with which of the following statements ‘ concerning members of minority ethnic groups? (A) It is necessary for the members of suchgroups to adapt to the culture of the majority. (B) The members of such groups generally encounter a culture that is static and undifferentiated. (C) Social mobility is the most important feature ' ' of the experience of members of such groups. (D) Social scientists should emphasize the cultural and political aspects of the experience of . members of such groups. (E) The assimilation of members of such groups requires the forced abandonment of thdr authentic national roots. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 24. 25. The author implies that the Puerto Rimn writers who have written most about assimilation do NOT do which of the following? (A) Regard assimilation as benign. (B) Resist cultural integration. (C) in detail the process of assimilation. (D) . Take into account thefcolonial nature of the Puerto Rican case. (B) Criticize supporters of Puerto Rico’s common- wealth status. It can be inferred from the passage that the “colo- nialist" approach is so called because its practi- tioners" (A) support Puerto Rico’s commonwealth status (B) have a strong tradition of cultural accommoda- ' tion ' L . (C) emphasize the class relations at work in both Puerto Rican and North American history (D) pose the clash of national cultures as an abso- lute polanty in which each culture is under: stood as statiE'and‘u—rfdil‘ferentiate (E) regard the political relation of Puerto Rico to H the United States as a significant factor in the experience of Puerto Ricans ( \ 26. The author regards the emphasis by island-based 804 writers on the cultural and political dimensions of assimilation as- ' ‘ i (A) ironic (B) dangerous (C) fitting but misdirected . (D) illuminating but easily misunderstood (E) peculiar but benign . The example discussed in lines 51-54 is intended by the author to illustrate a (A) strength of the sociodemographic approach (B) strength of the “colonialist” approach (C) weakness of the sociodemographic approach (D) weakness of the “colonialist” approach (E) weakness of the cultural-accommodationist approach . GO ON r0 THE NEXT PAGE. Directionsz‘ Each question below consists of a word pn’nted in capital letters, followed by five lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letters. Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. OVERREACH: (A) disparage another’s work (B) aim below one‘s potential (C) seek to buy at a lower price (D) say less than one intends (E) tend to overstate 29. BULGE: (A) depressedregion (C) steep slope (E) short line (B) tilted plane (D) rippled surface 30. FACILITATE: (A) evict (B) thwart (C) define (D) make excuses for (E) call attention to 31. EULOGY: (A) defamation (B) fluctuation (C) characterization (D) hallucination (E) deprivation 32. 33. 34. 36. 37. 38. 805 FRACAS: . ‘ (A) functional compromise (B) reasonablejudgment (C) peaceable discussion (D) plausible exception (E) theoretical approach ' HARROW: (A) assuage (D) repel (E) invert (B) levy (C) suffice BOOR: (A) forthright individual (B) brave fighter (C) deceitful ally (D) civil person (E) steadfast friend . HACKNEYED: (A) fresh (B)‘illicit I (C) careful (D) unpopular (E) dissenting SODDEN: (A) barren (B) desiccated (C) temperate (D) expedient (E) artificial GAINSAY: (A) hesitate (B) intercede (C) perceive (D) concur (E) praise NICE: (A) indirect (B) indecisive; (C) imperceptible (D) imprecise (E) imperturbable hFOR GENERAL TEST 20 ONLY _ AnsWer Key and Percentages“ of Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly ANALYTICAL ABILITY VERBAI. ABILITY ‘mm— Sum-5 1 mm mm Mum c c 1 a 1 x A 31 A a 2 A 2 D V '62 a A 3 a - a c1 53 D A 4 D 4 a 94 D D 5 A 5 D 62 E a s D s E 53 E c 7 B 7 D so A A a A a E w c D 9 a 9 D 74 D A 10 c 10 E 57 B c 11 D 11‘ D 40 a A 12 c 12 A 69 c D 137 c 13 A 54 E B 14 c 14 c 29 c D 15 A 15 A 56 A c 16 a 16 E 16 D ~ 3- 17 a 17 a 48 c E 13 c 13 c 35 E A 19 c 19 5 43 B E 20 a 20 c- '44 D a 21 a 21 c 45 E c 22 E 22 c as A c 23 D 23 D 48 A- E~ 4.47. 24 A ‘ ——- ~- 24 ~~ B~— ~53 - 5 E c 25 E A 23 C D 26 A D B 27 E a D 23 D A D 29 A a A 39 D A c A D A B D D 'Esiimaled P9 for the group of examinees who took the GRE General Test in a recent three-year period. 806 ...
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Bigbook_20 - Time —. 30 minutes : 38 Questions...

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