Bigbook_21 - SECTION 3 Time—3O minutes 38 Questions...

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Unformatted text preview: SECTION 3 Time—3O minutes 38 Questions Directions: each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that b_es_t fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. Many artists believe that successful imitation. far from being symptomatic of a lack of ---—-, is the first step in learning to be creative. (B) resolutibn (C) goodness (E) sympathy (A) elegance (D) originality 2. As serious as she is about the bullfight, she does not _ allow respect to -----« her sense of whimsy when painting it. (A) inspire (B) provoke (C) suppress (D) attack (E) satisfy ' 3. No one is ------— about Stephens; he inspires either uncritical adulation or profound —-~-- in those who work for him. (A) neutral. .antipathy (B) infuriated. .aversion (C) wom‘ed. .anxiety (D) enthusiastic. .veneration (E) apprehensive. .constemation 4. Before about 1960, virtually all accounts of evolu- tion assumed most adaptation to be a product of selection at the level of populations; recent studies of evolution, however, have found no —--—-— this —— view of Selection. (A) departures from. .controversial (B) basis for. .pervasive (C) bias toward. .unchallenged (D) precursors of. .innovative (E) criticisms of. .renowned Each sentence below has one or two blanks. 821 5. The new biological psychiatry does not deny the contributing role of psychological factors in mental illnesses. but posits that these factors may act as a catalyst on existing physiological conditions and ---- -- such illnesses. (A) disguise (B) impede (C) constrain (D) precipitate (E) consummate . During periods of social and cultural stability, many an academies are so firmly controlled by -— that all real creative work must be done by the -——--—. (A) ‘ dogmatists. disenfranchised (B) managers. .reactionaries (C) reformers. .dissatisfied (D) imposters. :acadernicians (E) specialists. .elite . The First World War began in ‘a context ofjargon and verbal delicacy and continued in a cloud of ---— as ----- e- as language and literature. skillfully used. could make it. (A) cirCumlocution. .literal ’ (B) cliche. .lucid (C) euphemism. .imperfetrable (D) particularity. .deliberate (E) subjectivity. .enthralling GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. ‘ '\ Directions: In each of the following questions, a related /l2_. BIRD : SNARE :2 (A) lion : den (B) fish : seine pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs (C) lamb: shears (D) scorpion: sting of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best (E) lobster : claw expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the . 0’13"“ Pa“ 13.) RESOLUTENESS : WILL :: (A) m1 : conviction , - (B) honor: restitution (C) esteem : adoration 8. THERMOMETER : TEMPERATURE :: (D) anguish : hesitation (E) sorrow : compassion (A) planezthickness ~34 (B) wrenchztorque (C) camerazexposure (D) compass : direction 14. MILLER : GRAIN :: (A) carpenterrawl ' (B) forgerzfurnace (C) tanner: hide (E) . dstonczshamcss (D) vintner:wine (E) masonzeement A9. FootpnooriFAiL: (A) translucentzfilter 15' DIDACIICIINSIRUCI “ . . . "l V . ‘ . _ (A) pedantic . contend (B) comic . amuse ~ (B) Viscous.smear (C)_volatile.explode . . - . . I (D) aimshtncak (E) mmzbrcak (C) theatrical . applaud (D) imperative . obey ' (E) rhetorical : recite 10. SUFFOCATE:OXYGEN.::. (A).restrict:supplies la GARRULOUSzTALK-ATIVE: (B) rob.money (C) mhibit.dnvcs - - . _ - , . . . _ . (A) suspicrous . unreliable (D) imprison .freedorn (E) starve.nutnents (B) mmkcrousmbmse (C) cloyingzsweetv " . "”“lt‘ORCHESTRA‘1‘MUSlCtt—(Afiocalisfisonr"'-—* ’(Drreflective‘rinsightful“ “‘ - -- r” ~-—'-‘--~~~—— (B) poetranthology (C) actorzcues (E) prudentzindecisive (D) choreographerzballet (E) troupe : drama GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 822 L1! 5) 0) Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage. choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is that passage. Geologists have long known that the Earth's mantle is heterogeneous, but its spatial arrangement remains unresolved—is the mantle essentially layered or irregu- ‘ larly heterogeneous? The best evidence for the layered- mantle thesis is the Well—established fact that volcanic rocks found on oceanic islands, islands believed to result from mantle plumes arising from the lower mantle, are composed of material fundamentally different from that of the midocean ridge system, whose source, most geolo~ gists contend, is the upper mantle. Some geologists, however, on the basis of obser- vations concerning mantle xenoliths, argue that the mantle is not layered, but that heterogeneity is created by fluids rich in “incompatible elements" (elements tending toward liquid rather than solid state) percolating upward and transforming portions of the upper mantle irregularly, according to the vagaries of the fluids’ path- ways. We believe, perhaps unirnaginatively, that this debate can be resolved through further study, and that the underexplored midocean ridge system is the key. l7. Which of the following best expresses the main idea of the passage? (A) Current theories regarding the structure of the Earth's mantle cannot account for new discoveries regarding the composition of mantle xenoliths. _ (B) There are conflicting hypotheses about the heterogeneity of the Earth's mantle because few mantle elements have been thoroughly studied. (C) Further research is needed to resolve the debate among geologists Over the composition of the midocean ridge system. I (D) There is clear-cut disagreement within the geological community over the structure of the Earth’s mantle. (E) There has recently been a strong and exciting challenge to geologists’ long-standing belief in the heterogeneity of the Earth’s mantle. 823 stated or im lied in [8. According to the passage, it is believed that oceanic islands are formed from (A) the same material as mantle xenoliths (B) the same material as the midocean ridge system (C) volcanic rocks from the upper mantle (D) incompatible elements percolating up from the lower mantle (E) mantle plumes arising from the lower mantle 19. It can be inferred from the passage that the sup- porters of the “layered-mantle” theory believe which of the following? I. The volcanic rocks on oceanic islands are ' composed of material derived from the lower part of the mantle. . II. The materials of which volcanic rocks on oceanic islands and midocean ridges are composed are typical of the layers from V which they are thought to originate. III. The differences in composition between * volcanic rocks on obeanic islands and the midocean ridges are a result of different concentrations of incompatible elements. (A) I only (B) III only (C) I and [I only (D) II and 111 only (E) I, II, and III 20. The authors suggest that their proposal for deter- mining the nature of the mantle‘s heterogeneity might be considered by many to be (A) pedestrian (B) controversial (C) unrealistic (D) novel (E) paradoxical GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. line {5) (10) (I5) (20) (25) (30) {35) {40) (45) ( 50) (55) Many literary detectives have pored over a great- puzzle concerning the writer Marcel Proust: what happened in 1909 7 Howdid Centre Saint-Beuve, an essay attacking the methods of the critic'Saint- Beuve, turn into the start of the novel Remembrance of Things PasrTA recently published letter from Proust to the editor Vallette confirms that Fallois, the editor of the l954 edition of Centre Saint-Beuve, made an essen- tially correct guess about the relationship of the essay to the novel: Fallois proposed that Proust had tried to begin a novel in 1908, abandoned it for what was to be a long demonstration of Saint-Beuve‘s blindness to the real nature of great writing, found the essay giving rise -to personal memories and fictional developments,- and allowed these to take over in a steadily developing novel. Draft passages in Proust’s 1909 notebooks indicate that the transition from essay to novel began in Centre Saint-Beuve ,jwhen Proust introduced several examples to show the powerful influence that involuntary memory exerts over the creative imagination. In effect in trying to demonstrate that the imagination is more profound and less submissive to the intellect than Saint-Beuve assumed, Proust elicited vitalrnemories of his own“ andeindin—g subtlaonnections between them, began to amass the material for Remembrance. By August Proust was writing to Vallette, informing him of his intention to develop the material as a novel. Maurice Bardeche; in 'Marcel Proust, remancier, has shown the importance in the drafts of Remembrance of sponta- neous and apparently random associations of Proust’s subconscious. As incidents and reflections occurred to Proust, he continually inserted new passages altering and expanding his narrative. But he found it difficult to control the drift of his inspiration. The very richness and complexity of the meaningful relationships that kept presenting and rearranging themselves on all levels, from abstract intelligence to profound dreamy feelings, made it difficult for Proust to set them out coherently. The beginning of control-came when he saw how to connect the beginning and the end of his novel. Intrigued by Proust’s claim that he had “begun and finished" Remembrance at the same time, Henri Bonnet discovered that parts of Remembrance 's last book were actually started in 1909. Already in that year, Proust had drafted descriptions of his novel's characters in- their old age that would appear in the final book of Remembrance, where the permanence of art is set against the ravages of time. The letter to Vallette, drafts of the essay and novel, and Bonnet's researches establish in broad outline the process by which Proust generated his novel out of the ruins of his essay. But those of us who hoped, with Krolb, that Kolb‘s newly published complete edition of Proust’s correspondence for 1909 would docu- ment the process in greater detail are disappointed. For until Proust was confident that he was at last in sight of a viable structure for Remembrance, he told few correspon- dents that he was producing anything more ambitious than Centre Saint—Beuve. ‘ \ 2l. The passage is primarin concem'ed with (A) the role of involuntary memory in Proust’s “qifing I . ‘ . , (B) evidence concerning the genesis of Proust's novel Remembrance of Things Past (C) conflicting scholarly opinions about the value of studying-the drafts of Remembrance of Things Past - _ , (D) Proust’s correspondence and what it reveals about Remembrance of Things Pas! (E) the influence of Saint-Beuve’s criticism on Proust’s novel Remembrance of Things Past 22. It can be inferred from the passage that all of the ’ following are literary detectives who have tried, by means of either scholarship or criticism, to help solve the “great punle" mentioned.in lines 1-2 . EXCEPT ' (A) Bardeche- r (B) Bonnet (C) Fallois "—(DTKiSlb—‘Wn—WW """i— ' ' " TWA“ " (E) Vallette 23. According to the passage, in drafts of Centre Saint- BeuveProust set out to show that Saint-Beuve made which of the following mistakes as a critic? I. Saint-Beuve made no elTort to study the devel- opment of a novel through its drafts and revi- srons. - ». ' H. Saint-Beuve assigned too great a role in the creative process to a writer’s conscious intel- lect. ' " " III. Saint-Beuve concentrated too much on plots and not enough on imagery and other elements of style. (A) II only (B) III only I . (C) I and II only .(D) I and III only - (E) I, II, and III GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 324 «um-mu Kw 24. Which of the following best states thE‘aruihdrs-am- tude toward the information that scholars have gath- ered ab0ut Proust’s writing in 1909 ? (A) The author is disappointed that no new docu- ments have come to light since Fallois’s Specu- lations. l (B) The author is dissatisfied because there are too _,.many gaps and inconsistencies in the drafts. (C) The‘author is c0nfident that Fallois’s 1954 guess has been proved largely correct, but regrets that still more detailed documentation con- cerning ProustYs transition from the essay to the novel ha§"not emerged. (D) The author is satisfied that Fallois’s judgment was largely correct, but feels that Proust’s early work in designing and writing the novel was probably far more deliberate than Fallois's description of the process would suggest. (E) The author is satisfied that the facts of PrOust's life in l909 have been thoroughly established, but believes such documents as drafts and correspondence are only of limited value in a critical assessment of Proust’s writing. . The author of the passage implies that which of the following would be the LEAST useful source of information about Proust‘s transition from working on Conlre Saint-Beuve to having a viable structure for Remembrance of Things Part? (A) Fallois’s cements in the 1954 edition of C ontre Saint-Beuve ' (B) Proust's_ l909 notebooks, including the drafts of Remembrance of Things Part (C) Proust’s I909 correspondence, excluding the letter to Vallette ' ' (D) Bardéche’s Marcel Proust, romancier (E) Bonnet’s researches concerning Proust’s drafts of the final book of Remembrance of Things’ Part 825 26. The passage offers information to answer which of the,ngpwing questions? . (A) Precisely when in l909 did Proust decide to abandon Contre Saint-Beuve? (B) Precisely when in l909.did Proust decide to connect the beginning and the end of «:2 Remembrance of Things Part 7' (C) What was the subject of the novel that Proust attempted in 1908 ? (D) What specific criticisms of Saint-Beuve appear, in fictional form. in Remembrance of Things Part? (E) What is a theme concerning art that appears in the final book of Remembrance of Things Part? ' . Which of the following best describes the relation- ship between Contre Saint-Beuve and Remembrance of Things Past as it is explained in the passage? (A) Immediately after abandoning Conlre Saint- Beuve, at Vallette’s suggestion. Proust started Remembrance as a fictional demonstration that Saint-Beuve was wrong about the imagi- nation. _ ' (B) ‘lmmediately after abandoning Contre Saint- Beuve, at Vallette’s suggestion. Proust turned his attention to Remembrance. starting with incidents that had occurred to him while planning the essay. (C) Dcspondent' that he could not find a coherent structure for Contre Saint-Beuve, an essay about the role of memory in fiction, Proust began instead to write Remembrance, a novel devoted to important early memories. (D) While developing his argument about the imagination in Comre Saint-Beau , Proust described and began to link together per- sonal memories that bemrne a foundation for Remembrance. ' (E) While developing his argument about memory and imagination in Contre Saint-Beuve, Proust created fictional characters to embody the abstract themes in his essay. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. ‘ \ Directions: Each question below consists of a word / 33.’ COMMODIOUS: (A) calm (B) careless printed in capital letters, followed by five lettered words (C) reticent (D) enclosed (E) cramped or phrases. Choose the lettered wbrd or phrase that is' ‘ ' ' ' ~ ' most nearly oggosite in meaning to the word in capital letters. 34. CORROBORATE: (A) complicate . (B) controvert (C) conflate ' Since some of the questions require you to distinguish - ‘ (D) condone (E) counterfeit ' fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the e ‘ 'd' hich ' t. ‘ ' chorces before decr mg w one is bes 35- M A CULATED: (A) unobserved (B) (C) unplanned 28; FREQUENT: (A) contain (B) restore ' (D) unrefined (E) Red (C) sever (D) ViSil my (E) defend @gcrly r ' ‘ ' " ‘ " ' H , —— — r '36. ESOTERIC: (A) unsophisficated 29. COMPOUND: A reveal B concentrate (B) worthless (C) lasting (C) activate (1(3) )conserve ((2-3) separate (D) Scum” known (B) wellcxpfcssed ” 30} CRAS§;”_(A) denim (B) heriéi A 7 (VCR—US$35:- V(A)W=§1$and (B) enjoy (C) refined (D) intrepgid (E) fair ' (C) nulhfy (D) abet (E) prepan; 3L pLASTICITY: (A) tightness (B) configuity 38. ASPERSIONS: (A) qualms (B) apologies ——-*—- fifi'mfim‘gmtyfimrm"_‘“‘“'"‘——_(G}mds -- (D)-chafion"i"(E)-flattery—“-" -~ ~ 32. CONVOKE: (A) forgive (B) eradicate ((C) adjourn (D) omit ‘ (E) abridge 826 Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indiwting that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that b_e_s_t fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. 1. Because no comprehensive exist regarding personal reading practices, we do not know, for example, the greatest number of books read in an individual 1ifetirr'1e. (A) records (B) instincts '(C) ' ' . (D) proposals ‘ (E) commercials ' 2. hour corporation there is a‘ between male and female bemuse 73 percent of the men and 34 percent of the women polled believe that our company provides equal compensation to men and women. (A) contrast. .stereotypes (B) difference. .perceptions (C) variation. .salan‘es (D) resemblance. .employees ’ (E) similarity. .aspirations 3. The wonder of De Quincey is that although opium dominated his life, it never -— him; indeed, he turned its use to when he published the story of its influence in the London Magazine. (A) overcame. .altruism (B) intimidated. .triumph‘ (C) distressed. .pleasure (D) conquered. .gain. (E) released. .neces'sit'y 4. The reduction of noise has been in terms of its sources, but the alternative of canceling noise out by adding sound with the opposite wave pattern may be more useful in practice. (A) justified. .diffusing (B) accomplished. .tracking (C) conceived. .concealing (D) explained. .isolating - (E) approached. .eliminating guy A AVA \ u' Time—30 minutes . 38 Questions , ‘ ‘ . 5. While Parker is very outspoken on issues she cares 840 about, she is not -——-; she concedes the -—— of opposing arguments when they expose weaknesses inherent in her own. ~ . .- (A)' fickle. .Validity (B) arrogant. .restraint (C) fanatical. .strength (D) congenial. . incompatibility (E) unyielding. .speciousness . Hampshire’s assertions, far from showing that we can -_—- the ancient puzzlw about objectivity, reveal the issue to be even more than we had thought. (A) adapt. .pressing (B) dismiss. .relevant (C) rediscover. unconventional (D) admire. .elusive (E) appreciate. .interesting . Usually the first to spot data that were‘inconsistent - with-other- findings; in—this particular experiment she let a number of —— results slip by. (A) inaccurate (B) verifiable (C) redundant (D) salient- - (E) anomalous GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. _,.. _._ . _.__~_~.4~__.__W Directions: In each of the following questions, a 'related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. 10. ll. l2. TORNADO : AIR :: (A) whirlpool : water (B) sinkhole : ground (C) forest : fire (D) gusher : oil (E) thunderbolt : lightning SINGER : CHOIR :: (A) flower : bouquet (B) leaf: forest (C) flute : reed (D) line : sculpture (E) rhythm : time PIGMENT ; COLOR :: (A) sizing: fabric (B) spice: flavor (C) steel : alloy (D) fertilizerzsoil (E) rock2energy LABYRINTH : TORTUOUS :: A (A) ornament : decorative (B) eaitorial': refutable (C) portraitzaccurate (D) posterzstartling (E) pageant: retrospective ‘ PRATE : SPEAK :: (A) digress : conclude (B) probetcxamine (C) soar: travel (D) wheedle : coax (E) saunter:wall< 841 l3. 14. Hi 16. PERTURB : SERENITY :: (A) caresszaffection ‘ (B) protect: security (C) harangue : bombast (D) annoy : consideration (E) reassurezdoubt FURTIVE : STEALTH :2 (A) loquacious : intelligence (B) immoral : contrition (C) pontifical : reverence (D) whimsical : caprice (E) arduous : endurance TENDER : ACCEPTANCE :: t (A) publish: wisdom ‘ (B) exhibitzinspection V , (C) scrutinizezforesight .- (D) authorize : approval ' < (E) declare: observation PLUTOCRACY : WEALTH :: (A) democracy : freedom (B) aristocracyzland" (C) gerontocracy : age‘ (D) technocracy : ability (E) autocracy : birth GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. _7 "nt 5) 9) U Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questionsfiasedon its content. After reading a passage, choose the best an5wer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is stated or implied—lint ~ that passage. Traditional research has confronted only Mexican and United States interpretations of Mexican-American culture. Now we must also examine the culture as we Mexican Americans have experienced it, passing from a sovereign people to compatriots with newly arriving settlers to, finally, a conquered people—a charter mi- nority on our own land. When the Spanish first came to Mexico, they inter- . married with and absorbed the culture of the indigenous Indians. This policy of colonization through acculturation was continued'when Mexico acquired Texas in the early 1800’s and brought the indigenous Indians into Mexican life and govemmentzln the'1820’s, United Statcsgcitizens migrated to Tex‘asfattracted by land suitable for cotton. As their numbers became more substantial, their policy of ‘ acquiring land by subduing native populations began to dominate. The two ideologies clashed repeatedly, culmi- nating in a military conflict that led to victory for the 19. According to the passage, a major difference ; _ tween the colonization policy of the .United sums} and that of Mexico in Texas in the 1800’s was the' (A) degree to which policies were based on: tradition (B) form of economic interdependency between different cultural groups A . . (C) number of people who came to settle new areas (D) treatment of the native inhabitants -. q (E) relationship between the military and the . Which of the following statements most‘clcarly' contradicts the information in this passage? . (A) In the early 1800‘s, the Spanish committed more resources to settling Califomia‘ than to developing Texas. " ‘ (B) While Texas-was under Mexican control, the ____ _. _,___.._ -- __.——e-.— population—of- Texas quadruplethn'n’spitrof‘ United States. llius, suddgmy'dEprived 'of our parent culture, we had to evolve uniquely Mexican-American modes of thought and action inorder to survive. 17. The author’s purpose in writing this passage is primarily to (A) suggest the motives behind Mexican and United States intervention in Texas (B) document certain early objectives of Mexican- American society (C) provide a historical perspective for a new anal- ysis of' Mexican-American culture (D) appeal to both Mexican and United States scholars to give greater consideration to economic interpretations of history (E) bring to light previously overlooked research on Mexican Americans 18. The author most probably uses the phrase “charter minority" (lines 6-7) to reinforce the idea that Mexican Americans - (A) are a native rather than an immigrant group in the United States (B) played an active political role when Texas first became part of the United States (C) recognized very early in the nineteenth century the need for official confirmation of their rights of citizenship (D) have been misunderstood by scholars trying to interpret their culture (E) identify more closely with their Indian heritage than with their Spanish heritage 842 the fact that Mexico discouraged immigration from the United States: ' (C) By the time Mexico acquired Texas, many 7 Indians had already married people of. -._- Spanish heritage. ‘ (D) Many Mexicans living in Texas returned to Mexico after Texas was annexed by the United States. , , r. e (E) Most Indians living in Texas resisted Spanish acculturation and were either killed or enslaved. * GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. "—4—. ~_..-—m...., . [0/ I5) 30) 35) 30) 35) :0) 15) This passage was adapted from an article published in 21. 1982. Until about five years ago, the very idea that peptide hormones might be made anywhere in the brain besides the hypothalamus was astounding. Peptide hormones. scientists thought, were made by endocrine glands and the hypothalamus was thought to be the brains’ only endocrine gland. What is more. because peptide hor- mones cannot cross the blood-brain barrier; researchers believed that they never got to any part of the brain other than the hypothalamus, where they were simply produced and then released into the bloodstream. But these beliefs about peptide hormones were ques- tioned as laboratory after laboratory found that anti— serums to peptide hormones, when injected into the brain. bind in places other than the hypothalamus, indi- cating that either the hormones or substances that cross- react with the antiserums are present. The immunolng— 77 ical method of detecting peptide hormones by means of antiserums, however, is imprecise. Cross-reactions are possxble and this method cannot determine whether the substances detected by the antiserums really are the hormones. or merely close relatives. Furthermore, this method cannot be used to determine the location in the body where the detected substances are actually produced. , New techniqus of molecular biology, however, pro- vide a way to answer these questions. It is possible to make specific complementary DNA's (cDNA’s) that can serve as molecular probes to seek out the messenger 23 RNA’s (mRNA’s) of the peptide hormones. If brain cells are making the hormones, the cells will contain these mRNA’s. If the producs the brain cells make resemble the hormones but are not identical to them, then the cDNA’s should still bind to these mRNA‘s, but should not bind as tightly as they would to mRNA's for the true hormones. The cells containing these mRNA's can then be isolated and their mRNA's decoded to deter~ mine just what their protein products are and how closely the products resemble the true peptide hor- mones. The molecular approach to detecting peptide hor- mones using cDNA probes should also be much faster than the immunological method because it can take years of tedious purifications to isolate peptide hor- mones and then develop antiserums to them. Roberts, expressing the sentiment of many researchers, states: “I was trained as an endocrinologist. But it became clear .to me that the field of endocrinology needed molecular biology input. The process of grinding out protein purifications is just too slow.” If, as the initial tests with cDNA probes suggest, peptide hormones really are made in the brain in areas other than the hypothalamus, a theory must be devel- oped that explains their function in the brain. Some have suggested that the hormones are all growth regula- tors. but Rosen's work on rat brains indicates that this cannot be true. A number of other researchers propose that they might be used for interoellular communication in the brain. 343 l \ ‘ Which of the following titles best summarizes the passage? (A) Is Molecular Biology the Key to Understanding lntercellular Communication in the Brain? (B) Molecular Biology: Can Researchers Exploit Its Techniques to Synthesize Peptide Homones? ' (C) The Advantages and Disadvantages of the Immunological Approach to Detecting Peptide Hormones (D) Peptide Hormones: How Scientists Are Attempting to Solve Problems ofTheir Detection and to Understand Their Function (E) Peptide Hormones: The Role Played by Messenger RNA's in Their Detection The passage suggests that a substance detected in the brain by use of antiserums to peptide hormones may (A) have been stored in the brain for a long period of Lime , (B) play no role in the functioning of the brain (C) have been produced in some part of the body other than the brain (D) have escaped detection by molecular methods (E) play an important role in the functioning of the hypothalamus ' . According to the passage, confirmation of the belief that peptide hormones are made in the brain in areas other than the hypothalamus would force scientists to (A) reject the theory that peptide hormones are made by endocrine glands (B) revise their beliefs about the ability of anti- ‘ serums to detect peptide hormones (C) invent techniques that would allow them to locate accurately brain cells that produce peptide hormones (D) search for techniques that would enable them to distinguishlpeptide hormones from their close relatives (E) develop a theory that explains the role played by peptide hormones in the brain GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 24. Which of the following is mentioned in the passage as a drawbackof the immunological method of detecting peptide hormones? (A) It cannot be used to detect the presence of growth regulators in the brain. (B) It cannot distinguish between the peptide hormones and substances that are very similar to them. (C) It uses antiserums that are unable to cross the blood-brain barrier. ' (D) It involves a purification process that requires . , , , extensive training in endocrinology: (E) It involves injecting foreign substances directly into the bloodstream. -25. The.passage impliesthat, in doing research on rat brains, Rosen discovered that ' (A) peptide hormones are used for intercellular communication (B) complementary DNA’s do not bind to cells —__producingp’eptide’honfiones" (C) products closely resembling peptide hormones are not identical to peptide hormones .(D) some peptide hormones do not function as growth regulators (E) antiserums cross—react with substances that are not peptide hormones ‘ x 26: Which of the following is a way in which the immunological method of detecting peptide hormones differs from the molecular method? (A) The immunological method uses substances that react with products of hormone- producing cells, whereas the molecular method uses substances that react with a ~ specific component of the cells themselves (B) The immunological method has produced results consistent with long-held beliefs about peptide hormones, whereas the molecular method has produced results that» upset these beliefs. (C) The immunological method requires a great deal of expertise, whereas the molecular method has been used successfully by_ a nonspecialists. ' " ' ' ' i - ' (D) The immunological method can only be used to test for the presence of peptide hormones within the hypothalamus, whereas the molec- ular method can be used throughout the ‘ "—“”'“brain:"—__—”""““‘"“““"‘—”'_ —" (E) The immunological method uses‘probes that can only bind with peptide hormones, whereas the molecular method uses probes that bind with peptide hormones and sub- stances similar to them. 27. The idea that the field of endocrinology can gain from developments in molecular biology is regarded by Roberts with - - ~ (A) incredulity (B) derision (C) indifference ' (D) Pride (E) enthusiasm . ' GO ON TO THE NEXT PAQE. 844 Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters. followed by live lettered words or phrases. Choose the lettered word or phrase that is most nearly opposite in meaning to the word in capital letteysrxz:r:r'r—7ri 3.1.1:?“ _, Since some of the questions require you to'distinguish tine shades of meaning. be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. ORIENT: (A) hasten (B) defile (C) menace (D) confuse (E) decline 29. UNIMPEACHABLE: (A) irritable (B) preventable (C) unused to conflict (D) open to question (E) available for discussion 30‘ EXPEND: (A) pr0ceed toward (B) take away (C) place upon (D) hold to (E) store up 31. SEAMY: (A) decent and respectable (B) jagged and irregular (C) strict and authoritarian (D) ornate and adorned (E) subtle and dangerous 845 m ' to t4) ‘4) k1) UI 37. fLUClD: (A) unrecognized . DIATRIBE: (A) sermon (8) limited (C) murky (D) improbable (E) inconsistent . LASSITUDE: (A) a fear ot‘discovery (B) a feeling ofvigor (C) a twinge of embarrassment (D) a want of seriousness (E) a sense ot‘superiority . HALLMARK: (A) grave defect (B) valueless object (C) unfortunate incident { D) uncharacteristic feature (E) untimely event (B) discourse (C) eulogy (D) lecture (E) oration SEDULITY: (A) lack of indusu‘iousness (B) abundance of supporters (C) contradiction of doctrine (D) rejection of analysis (E) depletion of resources APPOSITE: (A) malevolent (B) implicit (C) disorganized (D) avoidable (E) irrelevant FOR GENERAL TEST:21 ONLY Answer Key and Percentages* of Examinees Answering Each Question Correctly 4 QUANTITATIVE ABILITY‘ ‘ _ ANALYTICAL ABILITY . VERBAL ABILITY . v Sacflon 3 m Section 1 Section 4 Sermon 2 I Secfion 5 Number Answer P + m Number Answer P + Number Answer P + I Numblr Answer P + 1. D 1 A 98 ' D A 1 . A 83 I A 85 2 c 2 5 74 A c 2 E, ' .2 o as 3 .A 3 D as B B 3 B _ as 3 c 62 4 B 4‘ E 59 D D 4 ’ E » 76 4 ’ E 83 5 D 5 c 59 B c 5 c 42 5 D 77 s A 6 B 64 D C‘ s D 67 5 B - 52 - _ 7 C 7 E 31 C A 7 C 61 7 E 75 a D a A 84 A B a D 44 a D 53 9 D 9 A 89 C C 9 A 91 9 B 74 10 E 78 10 B 76 A B 10 C 87 10 A 59 11 E 46 11 A 51 A A 11 C 23 11 E 75 12‘ —_B 57 12 E 42 C B 12 E 85 12 E 35 13 A_ 54 13 E 35 B D 13 C 30 13 E 25 14 c 40 14 D 28 A D 14 B 53 14 D 51 1 5 B' 38 1 5 B 21 C B 1 5 D 39 1 5 ' C 68 16 ' C 21 16 C 25 C 82 C 84 16 C 52 16 x D 45 17 D 43 17 C 79 E 81 _ A 83 17 B -55 I 17‘ B' A'6 -.1B-— ' E’ 82 ~13” A 76 C 76 D 77 13 C 47 13 C 53 19 c 47 19 D 69 B 77 D 66 19 c 76 ‘ 19 a 39 20 A 39 20 E 48 A 66 E 59 20 B 59 20 B 53 21 B 52 21 D 68 D 37 E 35 21 A 42 21 E 13 22 E 50 22 C 64 E 66 C 55 22 E 29 22 E 19 23 A 39 23 E 43 .C 59 C 43 23 D 37 23 A 34 24 c 45 24 8 7o 24 c 59 24 E 24 _ > ‘ v43 "25 _-,__L_; 55 __ __25_._£2_ — ——0— - — 25- — - e-E- r»1--29~*-‘25"—" _A' M ‘ ' 25 D 42 25 A 43 26 E A 26 A 53 26 . B 27 D E 27 C 50 27 B 23 D D 23 B 36 23 A 29 E D 29 B 31 29 E 30 C E 30 D 22 30 E 31 -- D A ‘ 32 C C 33 E 3 34 B D 35 E C 36 D A 37 D ‘ E 33 E YEsfirnated P» for the group of examinees who look the GFIE General Test in a recent three-year penodn 846 ...
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Bigbook_21 - SECTION 3 Time—3O minutes 38 Questions...

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