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Bigbook_23 - TEST 23 ‘ ‘ SECTION 1 Tune— 30 minutes...

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Unformatted text preview: TEST 23 ‘ ‘ SECTION 1 Tune— 30 minutes 38 Questions Directions; Each sentence below has one or two 5. The struggle ‘of the generations is one of the Wh blank indicatingthat something has been obvious consxangs of human affairs; therefore. it omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words may be Presumpmous f0 “8865‘ ‘hal the fiVall’)’ or sets of words. Choose the word or set of words for between young and old in Western society each blank that best fits the meaning of the sentence during the current decade is critical. as a WhOlc- (A) perennially (B) disturbingly I ' (C) uniquely _ (D) archetypally 1. The natural balance between prey and predator . - (E) mptiously has been increasingly , most frequently by ' ‘ human intervention. . . . i 6. Rhetoric often seems to over reason in a (A) celebrated (B) predicted (C) obSerVed heated debate, with both sides ——-'— in hyper- , (D) disturbed (E) questioned bole, ‘ ’ (A) cloud..subsiding 2. There is some the fact that the author of a (B) prevail..yielding book as sensitive and informed as Indian Arli- (C) triumph..engaging sans did not develop her interest in Native (D) reverberate..clamoring American art until adulthood, for she grew up in (E) trample..tangling a region rich in American Indian culture. (A) irony in (B) satisfaction in 7. Melodramas, which presented stark Oppositions r‘ 1‘ ‘(C) doubt about (D) .conccm abOUl bet'ween innocence and ci'iminality, virtue and - (E) presumptuousness m corruption, good and evil, were popular pre- cisely because they offered the audience a world 3. Ecology, like economics, concerns itself with the of - movement of valuable through a complex (A) bereft..theatrimlity _ network,ofproduoersandconsumersn, __ _.- . (B) .composed..adversity. , (A) commodities (B) dividends (C) full..circumstantiality (C) communications (D) nutrients (D) dcpnv°d~P°lafitY (E) amt-acts, (E) devoid..neutrality ‘4. Observable as a tendency of our culture is a of psychoanalysis: we no longer feel that it can solve our emotional problems. 7 (A)- divergence..certainty about 7 ‘ GO ON To THE NEXT PAGE r (B) confrontation..enigm'as in' - -r --— a .. ,. -. (C) withdrawal..belief in (D), defense..weaknesses in (E) failure..rigor in ‘ 889 Directions: ln each of the following questions, a __ related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that'best expresses a relationship similar to that. expressed in the original pair. 8.‘ NURIURE2CHILDzz ‘ (A) cultivatezerop ' (B) quenchzfire (C) marvelzinfant (D) secure:posses_sion (E) delimitzobligation 9. SAW:CARPENTER 2: (A) bmsthainter - (B) typewriter:author (C) trowel:bricklayer " (D) wagon1fanher ' (E) scissorsztailor ‘7‘. IO. EPITAPHzTOMBSTONE :: (A) pedestalzstatue (B) prologuecplay (C) melodyzsong (D) salutation: letter (E) motto:shield 11. SIMPER:SM1LE :: (Aibata‘plg‘nalk ’ ' (B) thoughtrblank __LC)_190k:csyy (D) leerzogle (E) wink:eye * 12. EGG:CH1CKENV:: (A) pearl:oyster (B) roezsalmon (C) shellzclam “F (D) skin:shark (E) tuskmalrus 890 173. 1'4. 15. 16. GLIMMERzDAZZLE :: (A) delineatezdisclaim ‘ (C) recitechamngue (E) munnurzresound (B) reeedezabdndon (D) muse 2 reflect RESCINDzLAW :: (A) postponezperfonnance (B) withdmwzcandidacy (C) defaultzdebt ’ (D) demote:hierarchy (E) retirezposition ENTANGLEleVOLVE :: (A) cautionzfear (B) compeliforce '(C)’grill:'(';i1éstion , (D) replicatezeopy (E) wavertédhere ALCHEMY:SCIENCE :: (A) sideshowzcamival (C) burlesquezcomedy (E) nostrum2remedy (B) forgery: imitation (D) ployztactic GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. ‘ \ Directions: Each passage in this group is followed by questions based on its content. After reading a passage, choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following a passage on the basis of what is Stated or m “ed in that passage. ' . -P—- (5). (10) (15) (20) A mysterious phenomenon is the ability of over~water migrants to travel on course.'Birds, bees, and other species can keep track of time without any sensory cues from the outside world, and such “biological clocks” clearly con- tribute to their‘compass sense.” For example, they can use the position of the Sun or stars, along with the time of‘day, to find north. But compass sense alone cannot explain how birds navigate the ocean: after a flock traveling east is blown far south by a storm, it will assume the proper northeasterly courSe to compensate. Per- haps, some scientists thought, migrants deter mine their geographic position on Earth by ce- lestial navigation, almost as human navigators use stars and planets, but this would demand of the animals a fantastic map sense. Researchers now know that some species have a magnetic sense, which might allow migrants to determine their geographic location by detecting variations in the strength of the Earth’s magnetic field. 17. The main idea of the passage is that 18. (A) migration over land requires a simpler explanation than migration over water _‘ does “(3) the—'me'a'ns by which‘animals migrate over water are complex and only partly understood (C) the ability of migrant animals to keep track 7 - <——— of—timeis- related‘te-their—magnetic-sense - r~ ~ (D) knowledge of geographic location is essential to migrants with little or no compass sense (E) explanations of how animals migrate tend r »to replace, rather than build on, one another It can be inferred from the passage that if the flock of birds described'in lines 8-12 were navi- gating by compass sense alone, they would, after the storm. fly (A) east' (B) north (C) northwest (0) south (E) southeast 891 19 20. . ln maintaining that migrating animals would need “a fantastic map sensei’ (line 17) to deter- mine their geographic position by celestial navi- gation, the author intends to express (A) admiration for the ability of the migrants (B) skepticism about celestial navigation as an explanation ‘ (C) certainty that the phenomenon of migration ' will remain mysterious (D) interest in a new method of accounting for over-water migration - (E) surprise that animals apparently navigate in much the same way that'htiman beings do Of thefollowing descriptions of.migrating ani- mals. which most strongly suggests that the ani- mals are depending on magnetic cues to orient themselves? (A) Pigeons can properly readjust their course even when flying long distances through exceedingly dense fogs. (B) "Bison are able to reach their destination by passing through a landscape that has been-partially altered by a recent fire. (C) Elephants are able to find grounds that some members of the _herd_ have never seen before. i' _ “at ' (D) Swallows are able to return to a given spot at the sametime every year. (E) Monarch butterflies coming from different » at the same location each winter. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. ‘ pa‘rtsol‘NO’rth—A‘m'e‘fitfi’are'abie to‘arrive‘ —‘ W“ Roger Rosenblatt"s book Black Fiction, in attempt- ing to apply literary rather'than sociopolitical criteria to' its subject, successfully alters the approach taken by most previous studies. As Roscnblatt notes, criticism of: Black writing has often serVed as a pretext for ex- pounding on Black history. Addison Gayle's recent work, for example, judges the value of Black fiction by overtly political standards, rating each work ac- _cording to the notions of Black identity which it 'propounds. 7-:- ‘ Although fiction assuredly springs from political circumstances, its‘authors react to those circumstances in ways other than ideological, and talking about novels and stories primarily as instruments of ideology circumvents much of the fictional enterprise. Rosen- blatt’s literary analysis discloses affinities and con- nections among works of Black fiction which solely political studies have overlooked or ignored. 7. Wnfingacceptable_,criticism of Black fiction, how- ever, presupposes giving satisfactory answers to a number of questions. First of all, is there a sufficient reasbn,’ other than the racial identity of the authors, to group together worksrby Black authors? Second, how does Blackvfiction make itself distinct from other _ modern fiction with which it is largely contempora- neous? Rosenblatt shows that Black fiction constitutes a distinct body 0f writing that has an identifiable, coherent literary tradition. Looking at novels written ' by Blacks over the last eighty years, he discovers re- curring concerns and designs independent of chronol- ogy. These structures are thematic. and they spring, not surprisingly, from the central fact that the Black characters in these novels exist in a predominantly White culture, ‘whether they try to conform to that culture or rebel against it. Black Fiction does leave some aesthetic questions open. Rosenblatt's thematic analysis permits consider- able objectivity; he even explicitly states that it is not his intention to judge the merit of the various works— yet his reluctance seems misplaced, especially since an attempt to appraise might have led to interesting results. For instance, some of the novels appear to be structurally diffuse. Is this a defect, or are the authors working out of, or trying to forge, a different kind of aesthetic? In addition, the style of some Black novels, like Jean Toomer's Cane, verges on expressionism or surrealism; does this technique provide a counterpoint to the prevalent theme that portrays the fate against which Black heroes are pitted, a theme usually::on- veyed by more naturalistic modes of expression? In spite of such omissions, what Roscnblatt does include in his discussion makes for an astute and worthwhile study. Black Fiction surveys a wide variety of novels. bringing to our attention in the process 892 some fascinating and little-known works like James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography of an Ex—Colored Man. Its argument is tightly constructed, and its forthright, lucid ster exemplifies levelheaded and penetrating criticism; 2i . The author of the passage objects to criticism of Black fiction like that by Addison Gayle because it - (A) emphasizes purely literary aspects of such - fiction (B) misinterpret: the ideological content of such fiction (C) misunderstands the notions of Black identity contained in such fiction (D) substitutes political for literary criteria in evaluating such fiction ' (E) ignores the interplay between'Black‘ history and Black identity displayed insuch fiction ' 22. me author of the passage is primarily con- ,cerncdgwith . _ (A) evaluating the soundness of a work of * criticism (B) comparing various critical approaches to a , subject " (C) discussing the limitations of a panicqu kind of criticism (D) summarizing the major points made in a work of criticism (E) explaining the theoretical background of a certain kind of criticism GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. 23. The author of the passage believes that Black 24. 25. Fiction would have been improved had Rosenblatt (A) eValuated more carefully the ideological and historical aspects of Black fiction (B) attempted to be more objective in his approach to novels and stories by Black ‘authors _ a"; (C) explored in greater detail the recurrent thematic concerns of Black fiction throughout its history (D) established a basis for placing Black fiction within its own unique literary tradition (E) assessed the relative literary merit of the novels he analyzes thematically The author’s discussion of Black Fiction can be best described as ' (A) pedantic and contentious (B) critical but admiring (C) ironic and‘deprecating (D) argumentative but unfocused (E) stilted and insincere It can be inferred that the author of the passage would be LEAST likely to approve of which of the following? (A) An analysis of the influence of political events on the personal ideology of Black writers (B) A critical study that applies sociopolitical criteria to autobiographies by Black authors (C) A literary study of Black poetry that appraises the merits of poems according to the political acceptability of their themes . (D) An examination of the growth of a distinct Black literary tradition within the context of Black history (E) A literary study that attempts to isolate aesthetic qualities unique to Black fiction 893 ‘ \ 26. The author of the passage uses all of the follow- ing in the discussion of Rosenblatt's book EXCEPT (A) rhetorical questions (B) specific examples (C) comparison and contrast (D) definition of terms (E) personal opinion 27. The author of the passage refers to James Weldon Johnson’s Autobiography ofan Ex- Colored Man most probably in order to (A) point out affinities between Rosenblatt's method of thematic analysis and earlier criticism _ (B) clarify the point about expressionistic style made earlier in the passage 1 . (C) qualify the assessment of Rosenblatt's book made in the first paragraph of the passage (D) illustrate the affinities among Black novels disclosed by Rosenblatt’s literary analysis (E) give a specific example of one of the accomplishments of Rosenblatt‘s work 00 ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: Each question below consists of a word printed in capital letters, followedlby five lettered words or phrases. ChOose the lettered word or phrase that is most'nearly opposite in meaning to the ward in' capital letters. - Since some of the questions require you to distinguish fine shades of meaning, be sure to consider all the choices before deciding which one is best. 28. lNFlNl'lY: (A) bounded space (B) physical repulsion (C) inadequate measurement (D) 'weak charge (E) small miscalculation 29. TRUCE: (A) resumed fighting U A ‘ ' (B)‘falselprete'nscs ’(C) "genuine grievances (D) nonmilitary service (E) tactical error 30. 'DAMPECD: (A) phonetic (B) flexible (E) variable 31. TURBULENT: (A) obverse (C) serial (D) pacific (B) extensive (E) deflated 894 ,- 32. 33. 34. _ (B) meaningful ‘ 35. LUClD: (A) vagtie ‘ (B) cynical (C) tedious (D) unreliable (E) improper EBULLIENCEzi (A) po‘mposity (B) sterility (C) awkwardness (D) careful organization (E) calm restraint 7_ CAPRlCIOUS: (A) deductive (C) steadfast (E) straightforward (D) limited IMPASSIVE: (A) overwrought ' (B)' long—winded“ (C)"pomp0us' 36. 37‘ ._LC_)._amijflCd_..(DlVC0nCcmmtch.___.-._ M. a , ‘__. _ 38. (D) energetic (E) adept TORTUOUS: (A) gently inclined (ID-logically accurate (C) ' sumrountable (D) sparse (E) direct ' ' TOUT: (A) placate (B) misrepresent JElEEQEPMfl‘EIJI—(lemgpnm (E) deny the relevance of PROMPT : (A) betray (B) check (0 way" _,_(I?) complicate 7 (E) defer. nonhuman... .w. SECTION 4 Tune—30 minutes 38 Questions Directions: Each sentence below has one or two blanks, each blank indicating that something has been omitted. Beneath the sentence are five lettered words or sets-of words. Choose the word or set of words for each blank that be+st fits the meaning of the sentence as a whole. I. In the current research program, new varieties of apple trees are evaluated under different agricul- tural for tree size, bloom density, fruit size, to various soils, and resistance to pests and disease. " (A) circumstances..proximity (B) regula—tions..conforrnity (C) conditions..adaptability (D) auspices..susceptibility (E) configurations..propensity 7 2. At first, I found her gravity rather intimidating; but, as I saw more of her, I found that was very near the surface. YET-confidence” ‘ (D) poise (E) determination (AT seriousness (C) laughter 3. Even though in today’s Soviet Union the ' the Muslim clergy have been accorded power and privileges, the Muslim laity and the rank- and-file clergy still have little to practice their religion. (A) practitioners among..opportunity (B) dissidents within..obligation (C) adversaries of..inclination (D) leaders of..latitude (E) traditionalists among..incentive 4. file proponents of recombinant DNA research have decided to federal regulation of their work; they hope that by making this compro-' mise they can forestall proposed state and local controls that might be even stiffer. (A) protest (B) institute (C) deny (D) encourage (E) disregard 908 r 5. It is to the novelist’s credit that all of the epi-~ sodes in her novel are presented realistically; without any 'or playful supernatural tricks. (A) elucidation (B) discrimination (C) artlessness (D) authenticity (E) whimsy 6. Our new tools of systems analysis, powerful though they may be, lead to theories, especially, and predictably, in economics and political science, where productive approaches . have long been highly . (A) pragmatic-.speculative (B) inelegant..efficaCious (C) explanatory..intuitional (D) wrongheaded . . convergent (E) simplistic..elusive 7. Nineteenth-century scholars, by examining earlier geometric Greek art, found that classical » Greek art was not a magical or a brilliant blending— Egyptian‘andAASSyrian’art,‘but" was independently evolved by Greeks in Greece. (A) stratagem..appropriation (B) exemplar..synthesis .' (C) conversion..annexation (D) paradigm..construct (E) apparition..amalgam GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. Directions: ln each of the following questions, a related pair of words or phrases is followed by five lettered pairs of words or phrases. Select the lettered pair that best expresses a relationship similar to that expressed in the original pair. 8. ANXIOUS:REASSURANCE :: (A) resentfulzgratitude (B) perplexedzclarification (C) inured2imagination (D) vociferous : suppression (E) abstemious:indulgence 9. STANZAzPOEM :: (A) pirouettezballet (B) rhymezverse (C) duetzchorus (D) actzopera (E) mimicry:pantomime lO. COINtDENOMINATlON :: (A) Duokzti'tle (B) officerzrank (C) house:architecture (D) doctor2profession (E) treezwood ll. EMBELLISHzAUSTERE :: (A) condensezillusive (B) alterzremarkable (C) trainzclumsy (D) adulteratezpure (E) refine:unique 909 ii‘ 12. PORTFOLIO:SECURITIES :: (A) assessmentztaxes ‘ (B) computerzprograms (C) insurancezrisks (D) résumétcareers (E) dossierzreports l3. EXHORT25UGGEST :: (A) crave:accept (B) goadzdirect (C) instructzteach (D) tamper:adjust (E) C0nspire:plan l4. CLAY2PORCELA1N2: (A) glasszchina (B) firrezash (C) slagriron (D) flaleinen (E) sandzsediment 15. SERMON:HOMlLETlCS :: U . 4 (A) argumentzlogic (B) baseball:athletics (C) word:language (D) studentzpedagogy (E) albumzphilately l6. MATR1X2NUMBERS :: (A) gas:molecules (B) volumezliquid (C) erystal:atoms (D) interactionzreagents (E) stratumzlayer GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. ‘ \ Directions: Each passage in this "group is followed by questions based on its content. After a passage,,:choose the best answer to each question. Answer all questions following apassage on the basis of what is Stated or imp lied in that passage. The molecules of carbon dioxide in the Earth’s atmosphere affect the heat balance'of the Earth by aCting as a one-way screen; 'Although these molecules allow radiation at visible wavelengths, where most of the energy'of sunlight is concentrated, to pass through, they absorb some of the longer-wavelength, infrared emissions radiated from the Earth's surface, radiation that would otherwise be transmitted back - into space. For the Earth to maintain a constant aver- age temperature, such‘emisisions from the planet must balance incoming solar radiation. If there were no car- bon dioxide in the atmosphere, heat would escape from the Earth much more easily. The surface temper- . Nature would beso muchlower that the oceans might be a sofid mass of ice. Today, however, the potential problem is too much carbon dioxide. The burning of fossil fuels and the clearing of forests have increased atmospheric carbon and we continue to add carbon dioxide to the atmo- sphere. Could the increase in'carbon dioxide cause a global rise in average temperature, and could such a rise have serious conseciuences for human society? " Mathematical models that allow us to mlculate the rise in temperature as a function ,of the increase : ' indicate that the answer is probably yes. Under present conditions a temperature of -18°C can be observed at an altitude of 5 to 6 kilometers above the Earth. Below this altitude (called the radi...
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