SG_Chap6 - Chap 6 Momentum and Collisions 6.1 Impulse...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Page 1 Chap. 6. Momentum and Collisions • 6.1 Impulse – momentum theorem • In physics, it is defined as •Impulse = F· t (unit: N ·s) •In plain language, it is the time total of a force, it can change/move things •Remember: Work is a distance total; (W = Force X displacement) Baseball bat, hockey stick, ping pong racket
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Page 2 Average force Most of the time, the force is not constant. But you can always find an average for convenience Impulse is the area under the curve t F impulse For an given impulse, you can find the average force (giving an idea what can happen during that time period) Momentum The linear momentum of an object of mass m moving with a velocity is defined as the product of the mass and the velocity – SI Units are kg m / s – Vector quantity, the direction of the momentum is the same as the velocity’s p v m pv
Background image of page 2
Page 3 Impulse-momentum theorem Impulse = Change in momentum ma F t v v m F i f ) ( i f mv mv t F . Impulse Applied to Auto Collisions The most important factor is the collision time or the time it takes the person to come to a rest – This will reduce the chance of dying in a car crash Ways to increase the time – Seat belts – Air bags
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/02/2010 for the course PHY 101 taught by Professor Pralle during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

Page1 / 9

SG_Chap6 - Chap 6 Momentum and Collisions 6.1 Impulse...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online