Week5 - BIPN 102 Dr Fortes/19 Central Peripheral...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
BIPN 102 Chris Childers Dr. Fortes Fall 2009 Lecture 11 – 10/19 Lecture 12 – 10/21 Central & Peripheral Chemoreceptors : stimuli & mechanism Brain Stem – Medulla and pons Ventilation as a function of PACO2 Ventilation as a function of PAO2 Hiccup reflex (role of phrenic nerve in respiration) Autonomic Regulation (PS & S) Endocrine Regulation Local Regulation Hendersen-Hasselbach Equation (Take I) Lecture 13 – 10/26 Lecture 14 – 10/28 Buffers – proteins, phosphates, ammonia, bicarbonate Hendersen-Hasselbach Equation (Take 2) Proximal Tubule Cell Proximal Tubule Cell Cont. Interacalated Type A & B Cells Davenport Plots – metabolic acidosis/alkalosis, respiratory acidosis/alkalosis; response mechanisms 1. Cut below the medulla – No Respiration 2. Cut above the pons – Normal Respiration 3. Cut between the pneumotaxis and apneustic centers – Normal rhythm, long, deep breaths 4. Cut the vagus nerve – Normal rhythm, same duration, but deep breaths 5. Cut the phrenic nerve – Normal rhythm, shallow breaths
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Central Chemoreceptors - Typically account for >70% of ventilation activation - Ventral portion of the medulla, very near the CSF - Chemoreceptors respond to an increase in PCO2 - CO2 diffisues from the capillaries into the CSF and interstitial fluid - CO2 in CSF reacts with water and CA H+ & HCO3- - Central chemoreceptors respond to increase in H+ and also (mildly) to CO2 - Central chemoreceptors respiratory control centers hyperventilation decreased PCO2 (negative feedback loop) Ventilation as a function of alveolar PCO2….
Image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern