Ragtime - Ragtime Began as an improvised African-American folk tradition The first characteristic rhythm of ragtime was probably the syncopated

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Ragtime Began as an improvised African-American folk tradition The first characteristic rhythm of ragtime was probably the syncopated pattern of the cakewalk. •The first African-American instrumental music The practice of syncopating “straight” pieces can be traced back at least to bandleader Frank Johnson (1792-1844), who contemporaneous critics wrote about “distorting a simple song into a [Negro] country dance.” The term “ragtime” referred to making a “straight,” or square, rhythm syncopated, or “ragged.” (The term perhaps also refers to the fact that when African-Americans danced to these tunes, they often waved rags.) By the 1879s and 1880s, there were well known rag pianists who played music that was not written down but which was frequently a syncopated improvisation on a known song. •These improvisations often featured syncopated patterns in the right hand over a straight bass, or march, pattern in the left hand. Polyrhythms. •As this style became increasingly popular, many songs were written and published by
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2010 for the course MUSL MUSL 147 taught by Professor Lovensheimer during the Fall '08 term at Vanderbilt.

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Ragtime - Ragtime Began as an improvised African-American folk tradition The first characteristic rhythm of ragtime was probably the syncopated

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