TinPanAlley - Tin Pan Alley After the Civil War, there were...

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Tin Pan Alley After the Civil War, there were a lot of songs “of gentle sentiment” and “comfort after [the] sorrow” of the war. Songs also yearned for a past felt to have been simpler and freer from care. The parlor song grew a little more sophisticated. •As the theater became increasingly centralized in New York, so did music publishing. For varied reasons, many of the publishers wound up on W. 28 th Street between Broadway and Sixth Avenue. (Tin Pan Alley) •Two early and successful publishing firms were Edward B. Marks and M. Whitmark & Sons, the latter of which was founded by two underage brothers who used their father’s name. Tin Pan Alley “is an apt metaphor for an approach new to the trade: populist in tone, noisy with the sound of song pluggers, and shameless in the pursuit of commercial advantage” (292). •There was a “stratification of American popular song.” Songs from Broadway shows were in the top tier.
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TinPanAlley - Tin Pan Alley After the Civil War, there were...

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