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Revolution - 4 recreation the first two of these utilizes...

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Music of the Revolutionary War Era. Broadside ballads : Used tunes from old ballads and added new and often inflammatory words Often exploited intertextual references Printed on broadsides and in newspapers “The Liberty Song” The English song “A-Hunting we will go” becomes “A- Taxing we will go” related to protest songs and parodies Newly composed songs: “Bunker Hill,” a fuging tune by Andrew Law about the famous battle drew its words from a broadside, but the music was newly composed Marches and band music: Four uses for military music: 1. morale building 2. camp duties (signaling, such as reveille, taps) 3. public ceremonies (parades, inaugurations, etc.)
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Unformatted text preview: 4. recreation the first two of these utilizes what is known as “field music”; during the Revolution and after, this was often played by fifes and drums Ex. From class: “Lady Hope’s Reel”; “Yankee Doodle” The other popular use of bands was for Harmoniemusik , played by so-called “bands of music.” (This fits into the “recreation” category as Well as “public ceremonies). These used other instruments, usually in pairs : oboes, clarinets, horns, bassoons, trumpets. Ex.: “Washington’s March” composed to honor General Washington Ex.: “Hail Columbia” composed after the Revolution...
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  • Fall '08
  • lovensheimer
  • revolutionary war era, Newly composed songs, intertextual references Printed, Andrew Law, public ceremonies

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