rock and roll - Rock n roll Generally, and for our...

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Rock ‘n’ roll Generally, and for our purposes, “rock ‘n’ roll” refers to music before 1959, although the style of 1950s rock ‘n’ roll has never really gone out of fashion. “Rock,” often with a preceding adjective (“punk rock,” “art rock,” etc.), is used for styles after 1964. Roots were primarily in rhythm and blues, a general term for African-American music after 1949, that was based on 12-bar blues but was faster, often featured a boogie- woogie piano part, a “honking” sax sound, backbeats (emphasis on beats two and four in a four-beat bar). Also had roots in country music when country fused with blues and pop, at first without the backbeat (Elvis’s “That’s All Right (Mama)” doesn’t have a strong backbeat). Crawford: “rhythm and blues owed much to broadcasting. During the 1930s, There had been no such thing as a radio station aimed at black listeners. As black radio began to take shape, however, the new record labels
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This note was uploaded on 01/04/2010 for the course MUSL MUSL 147 taught by Professor Lovensheimer during the Fall '08 term at Vanderbilt.

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rock and roll - Rock n roll Generally, and for our...

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