populism - Populist perspectives In the 1920s and 1930s,...

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Populist perspectives In the 1920s and 1930s, Modernism was an important movement in European and American art music. It grew increasingly far from the interests of mainstream audiences, however. Especially during the 1930s, there was an increasing populist and collectivist temperament in the country that also contained strong strains of isolationism. This included a growing suspicion of things European. There were also federal projects that supported folk culture and local identities, and this translated into the use of folk materials in art music, which in turn suggested a populist style that many audiences could relate to. (Artists in other media such as Thomas Hart Benton, John Steinbeck, Dorothea Lang also expressed a populist view.) For instance, the U.S. government sponsored arts projects to help employ artists in varied genres. The Federal Project Number One (1935) was part of the larger Works Progress Administration (later Works Projects Administration; WPA). In terms of American music, this meant music that drew from American sources and
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populism - Populist perspectives In the 1920s and 1930s,...

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