ucsdPopulationgen1

ucsdPopulationgen1 - Darwin Evolution and Lamark Hardy...

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Darwin, Evolution and Hardy Weinberg Lamark: Inheritance of acquired characteristics: An individual who developed certain characteristics during their lifetime could pass this characteristic to their offspring Example: A bird who developed a stronger beak by breaking a lot of seeds would produce offspring with this stronger beak
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Charles Darwin Darwin born in 1809 He actually studied and obtained a degree in theology in Cambridge
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common descent with modification
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natural selection : Mechanism : How evolution works. How “fit” an organism is with his environment determines what traits will be passed on with greater frequency to next generation.
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Reproductive success : Species fit have best chance to live, reproduce , and pass traits onto offspring of next generation. unfit organisms survive less, breed less, less likely to be part of next generation
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Overproduction and struggle for existence. Produce more offspring than the environment can support
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Variations exist between members of the species
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1. Individuals in a population have unequal reproductive success
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Evidence for Evolution: Fossil record and radiometric dating
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Biogeography: Study of geographical localization of species Animals and plants found isolated on islands are very similar to one another and are quite different from similar type of animals and plants found on distant areas of the Earth. Ex. Darwin’s variety of finches unique to individual Galapagos Island
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Comparative Morphology Study comparing body structures of organisms Basic design of many body parts very similar among different species Example: Forelimbs of different mammals are very similar
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Comparative Embryology Study of the appearance of structures during development Embryos from organisms from a common ancestor demonstrate similar patterns of development
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Molecular Biology DNA sequences from evolutionarily related species are very similar
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The Modern Synthesis: The fusion of modern genetics with evolutionary biology Developed in the mid-1900s Population biology a key element
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Gene Pool: All the alleles of all the individuals in a population A population is the smallest biological unit that can evolve Microevolution: Evolution is a generation to generation change in a population’s gene pool Factors that change the gene pool of a population can result in populations changing over time (evolving)
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Five mechanisms of microevolution 1. Genetic Drift a.Random chance change of allele frequency b. Occurs in small population
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ucsdPopulationgen1 - Darwin Evolution and Lamark Hardy...

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