Life is a Dream 4

Life is a Dream 4 - Life is a Dream In Life is a Dream, by...

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Life is a Dream In Life is a Dream , by Pedro Calderón de la Barca, contrast and polarity of concepts are used to illuminate basic themes throughout the play. The juxtaposition of sleeping and dreaming, as well as the hybridity of the characters, works to demonstrate the notion of permeability and blurred lines between destiny and free–will. Sleeping vs. Dreaming 1. The simultaneous contrast and comparison between sleeping and waking, reality and dreaming, serve to demonstrate the fact that destiny and free–will are not necessarily set in stone, but rather have permeable boundaries. a. “Once/ I saw the same approving crowd/ Appear before me as distinct/ And clear as I perceive things now, / But I was dreaming.” (III.i.2349-2352) i. Segismund believes that what has actually happened is mere dream. In actuality, the dreams he thinks he has are events that have come to pass, illuminating the idea that dream and reality have a very flexible barrier. b. “Great events/ Are oft preceeded, my good lord, / By portents, which is what occurred when you did dreams these things before.” (III.i.2353-2355) i. Essentially, dreams can act as a portent (prophesy or omen) for what is destined to occur in
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Life is a Dream 4 - Life is a Dream In Life is a Dream, by...

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