HW6 - 1 bar. Assuming that the approach velocity of the...

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University of California – Santa Barbara Department of Chemical Engineering ChE10: Introduction to Chemical Engineering Professor Mike Gordon, Fall 2009 Homework #6: due Fri. Dec. 4, 2009 (1) Develop a “program” (Mathematica, Matlab, or Excel) to construct a Txy diagram for an ideal binary solution. Apply your program (by constructing a Txy diagram) to the benzene / meta-xylene system and answer the following question: A liquid mixture of benzene in m-xylene is sent to a flash vaporization drum operating at P=1 atm. Upon reaching the hot drum, some of the liquid vaporizes. If the gas stream leaving the drum must be 90 mol% benzene, what is the operating temperature of the drum? What is the liquid composition leaving the drum at this temperature? (2) Felder and Rousseau 7.5 (3) Felder and Rousseau 7.18 (4) Steam at 480 °C and 11 bar (absolute) is expanded through an insulated nozzle to 210 °C and
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Unformatted text preview: 1 bar. Assuming that the approach velocity of the steam is negligible, how fast does the steam exit the nozzle? (5) Your first task as a newly graduated ChemE is to design a boiler to produced saturated steam at 300 C. Because energy costs money, you decide to use waste hot water streams already in the plant to feed the boiler. The two waste liquid streams available (120 kg/hr @ 60 C and 180 kg/hr at 90 C) are mixed and fed to the boiler; steam leaves the boiler through a 5 cm pipe. Answer the following questions and make sure to state your assumptions: a) What is the boiler outlet pressure? b) What is the steam velocity coming out of the boiler? c) If electricity is roughly $0.05 per kW-hr, how much does it cost to operate the boiler per day ?...
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This note was uploaded on 01/05/2010 for the course CHE CH E 10 taught by Professor Gordon during the Fall '09 term at UCSB.

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