Nevid_14_child_adolescence

Nevid_14_child_adolescence - Abnormal Psychology in a...

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Abnormal Psychology in a Changing World SEVENTH EDITION Jeffrey S. Nevid / Spencer A. Rathus / Beverly Greene Chapter 14 Abnormal Behavior in Childhood and Adolescence
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Cultural Beliefs About What Is Normal and Abnormal Cultural beliefs help determine whether people view behavior as normal or abnormal. Because children rarely label their own behavior as abnormal, definitions of normality depend largely on how a child’s behavior is filtered through the family’s cultural lenses. Cultures vary with respect to the types of behaviors they classify as unacceptable as well as the threshold for labeling child behaviors as deviant.
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Prevalence of Mental Health Problems in Children and Adolescents According to a report from the U.S. Surgeon General, 1 in 10 children suffers from a mental disorder severe enough to impair development (“A Children’s Mental Illness ‘Crisis,’” 2001). The most commonly diagnosed psychological disorders in children age 6 to 17 are learning disabilities (11.5%) and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (8.8%). A telephone survey based on a national probability sample of American youth ages 12 to 17 found that 7% of the boys and 14% of the girls had suffered from major depression in the 6- month period preceding the survey (Kilpatrick et al., 2003).
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Risk Factors for Childhood Disorders Many factors contribute to increased risk of developmental disorders, including genetic susceptibility, environmental stressors (such as living in decaying neighborhoods), and family factors (such as inconsistent or harsh discipline, neglect, or physical or sexual abuse). Children with parents who suffer from depression also stand a higher risk of developing psychological disorders, perhaps because it leads to greater family stress. Gender is yet another discriminating factor.
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Risk Factors for Childhood Disorders Many factors contribute to increased risk of developmental disorders, including genetic susceptibility, environmental stressors (such as living in decaying neighborhoods), and family factors (such as inconsistent or harsh discipline, neglect, or physical or sexual abuse). Children with parents who suffer from depression also stand a higher risk of developing psychological disorders, perhaps because it leads to greater family stress. Gender is yet another discriminating factor.
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Play therapy. In play therapy, children may enact scenes with dolls or puppets that symbolically represent conflicts occurring within their own families.
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Pervasive Developmental Disorders Pervasive developmental disorders (pdds) - A class of developmental disorders characterized by significantly impaired behavior or functioning in multiple areas of development. Autism
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This note was uploaded on 06/04/2009 for the course SALL ajjag taught by Professor Serr during the Spring '09 term at École Normale Supérieure.

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Nevid_14_child_adolescence - Abnormal Psychology in a...

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