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Quechua lecture09-plus

Quechua lecture09-plus - Reading assignments Week...

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Reading assignments Week 11 (November 9-13) A.R. Frisancho, Humankind Evolving . Chapter 20. Haas, J.D. (1983) Nutrition and high altitude adaptation: An example of human adaptability in a multistress environment. In Rethinking Human Adaptation. In R. Dyson-Hudson & M.A. Little, eds . Optional Article by C. Beall (2007) Two routes to functional adaptation: Tibetan and Andean high altitude natives. Proc Nat Acad Sci . 104:8655-8660.
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Adaptive Domains at High Altitude
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4000 meters Sea level Altitude and Survivorship
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Neonatal Mortality and Altitude in the USA
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Altitude and Fertility in Peru
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Adaptive Domains The question is not limited to whether the domains represent different response at high altitude Rather, do individuals with different degrees of physisological and morphological responses to high altitude vary in their expression of the various adaptive domains?
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Native Adaptations to the High Altitude Andean Environment NS/Anth 2750 Human Biology & Evolution November 11, 2009
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High Altitude Areas of the Andes Altiplano Alt. >3000m Machu Pichu South America
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High altitude research sites in Peru and Bolivia Nuñoa, Peru (4000m) La Paz, Bolivia (3600m) High altitude research sites in Peru and Bolivia
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The Indigenous Population of the Andean Altiplano Quechua and Aymara speaking Amerindians Inhabited altiplano for 10000 years Massive population decline in 16th century Mostly rural farmers and herders-traditional technology Substantial urban population
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The Andean Environment of Southern Peru Hypobaric hypoxia Rugged terrain poorly developed soils Cold temperatures with wide diurnal variation Arid with seasonal rains Low primary productivity High cosmic radiation Altiplano above 3500m with mountains to 6000m
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Indigenous Quechua live primarily in rural areas
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