Skin color lect09 - Reading Assignments November 16-20...

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Reading Assignments November 16-20 Frisancho, A.R. Humankind Evolving , Ch 15, pp 223-227 Jablonski, N.G., and G. Chaplin. “Skin Deep”, Scientific American (October 2002, pp 73-79). Harmon, A. “In the DNS era, New worries about prejudice.” New York Times, Nov 11, 2007 Sankar, P.,and M.K.Cho. “Toward a new vocabulary of human variation. Science , 298:1337-1338.
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Adaptive Significance of Skin Pigmentation in Human Populations NS/Anth 2750 Human Biology & Evolution November 18, 2009
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Worldwide Distribution of Skin Color in Human Populations
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Worldwide distribution of human skin color
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Jablonski & Chaplin (2002) Scientific American
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Jablonski & Chaplin (2002) Scientific American
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Schematic rendering of a cross-section of human skin, showing laminar structure, main cell types, and appendages. (from Jablonski,N.G. Ann Rev Anthropol, 33:585-623; 2004) Sweat glands Melanocytes capillaries Keratinocytes
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The amount of skin pigmentation can be quantified by counting the number of melanocytes for different individuals and averaging the counts for different populations
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Predicted shading of skin colors for indigenous human populations Jablonski & Chapman (2000) J Hum Evol , 39:57-106 Darkest shades = greatest melanization Another way to quantify skin color is through measurement of the degree to which skin reflects light
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From Relethford (2003) The Human Species , 5 th Edition Skin Reflectance  According to Latitude equator
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From Relethford (2003) The Human Species , 5 th Edition Discontinuity in skin reflectance in 3 human populations ( Red dot is mean, length of bar is standard deviation) Discontinuous distribution of skin color  is used to justify racial clasifications
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From Relethford, J.H. (2003) The Human Species , 5 th Edition Interpopulation variation in skin reflectance Skin color distribution is continuous, so is racial  classification based on  skin color justified?
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From Relethford, J.H. (2003) The Human Species , 5 th Edition Original settlement of the United States from the perspective of skin color. From the continuous range of skin color in the human species, the majority of the earliest settlers were from the two extreme ends – dark colored West Coast Africans and light colored Western Europeans. This differential settlement gives rise to the seeming existence of two distinct races in the United States based on skin color
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2010 for the course NS 2750 taught by Professor Haas&gu during the Fall '08 term at Cornell University (Engineering School).

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Skin color lect09 - Reading Assignments November 16-20...

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