g104_class22-24_waves

g104_class22-24_waves - Geography 104 Ocean Waves what is a...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–23. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ocean Waves - what is a wave? - wave characteristics - ocean surface gravity waves Geography 104 - “Physical Geography of the World’s Oceans” Readings (Ocean Waves): Text Chapter 10 (pgs 190 - 217) Reader pgs. 231 – 242 (wave related material)
Image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
What is a wave? “In its simplest scientific form, a wave is an expression of the movement or progression of energy through a medium.” (Chamberlin and Dickey) “A wave is a disturbance that propagates through space and time usually with transference of energy.” ( Wikipedia )
Image of page 4
Ocean Wave Characteristics - propagating disturbance - characteristic length scale (wavelength) - characteristic time scale (period) - low frictional losses – thus able to travel long distances - energy transport (not water transport like currents*) - oscillatory (or cyclical) flow - weak interaction with other waves - movement depends on wave period and water depth - many types of waves in the ocean
Image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Types of ocean surface waves - waves need a generating mechanism, and a restoring force - at ocean surface , disturbing force is wind - capillary waves (wavelengths < ~1cm) are restored primarily by surface tension (of interest for remote sensing of the ocean) - surface gravity waves exist at air-sea interface and are restored by gravity - internal gravity waves (not wind driven) exist at density interfaces beneath the ocean’s surface and are restored by gravity
Image of page 6
internal and surface waves
Image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
internal waves from space
Image of page 8
Fig. 10.6
Image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Types of wave motion - progressive waves oscillate uniformly and travel (progress) without breaking particles move back and forth in direction of wave motion; examples: sound waves, pressure waves particles move back and forth in direction perpendicular to wave motion; occurs primarily in solids particles move in “orbitals” with both “back- and-forth” and “side-to-side” movement; need interface to exist; surface gravity waves
Image of page 10
Fig. 10.9
Image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
Image of page 13

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
ocean surface waves
Image of page 14
wave crests wave crest
Image of page 15

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
wavelength wavelength
Image of page 16
wave movement 90°
Image of page 17

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
changing wave crests
Image of page 18
Fig. 10.4
Image of page 19

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Fig. 10.5
Image of page 20
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern