some matters of form

some matters of form - Chaucer Some Matters of Form to...

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Unformatted text preview: Chaucer Some Matters of Form to Observe 1. Smoothly incorporate quoted material into your prose. Note where the quotation marks and line numbers of the text are placed. The title of the complete work, The Canterbury Tales , should be italicized or underlined. Sections of the longer work, such as the General Prologue or The Shipmans Tale or The Millers Prologue should be placed in quotation marks. Titles of short poems, such as Chaucers poem Gentilesse, are placed in quotation marks. Longer poems, such as Chaucers House of Fame or William Langlands Piers the Plowman , are underlined or italicized. Example: Gawain flatly refuses a command from the King to escort Guinevere to her death: "That will I never do, for wit you well I will never be in that place where so noble a queen as is my lady shall take such a shameful end" (399). 2. The form used to quote lines of poetry is different from the form used to quote prose. In The Canterbury Tales , almost all the lines are verse. Short quotations should be written with slash lines to indicate line breaks. If you , almost all the lines are verse....
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This note was uploaded on 01/06/2010 for the course ENGL 315 taught by Professor Caldwell during the Spring '09 term at CSU Fullerton.

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some matters of form - Chaucer Some Matters of Form to...

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