nun's priest and manciple's tales

nun's priest and manciple's tales - Chaucer English 315...

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Chaucer English 315 Beast Fables: “The Nun’s Priest’s Tale“ and “The Manciple’s Tale” 1. Is the Nun’s Priest quyting any tale or taleteller with his own Tale? 2. Besides a satire of courtly love or chivalric values, what other critiques (against women? Against vain speakers?) are being offered? 3. Why does the Host character the Nun’s Priest as he does in the prologue and epilogue to the Tale? 4. In terms of dream interpretation, what type of learning does Pertelote value? What type of learning does Chauntecleer value? In what way might this be construed as a satire against the learned interpreters of medieval society? 5. How is language used in this tale to convince or deceive others? What is the message about language that seems to be delivered here? 6. One of the morals of this Tale, spoken by the Nun’s Priest, seems to be “swich it is for to be recchleless / And negligent, and truste on flaterye” (3436-7). Another
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nun's priest and manciple's tales - Chaucer English 315...

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