Clerk's Tale - Chaucer English 315 The Clerk’s Prologue...

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Unformatted text preview: Chaucer English 315 The Clerk’s Prologue and Tale 1. How would you characterize the Clerk’s relationship with his “superiors,” starting with the Host? Why does the Clerk make such a point of telling the source of his tale (Petrarch) in the “Prologue”? The Norton editors of The Canterbury Tales offer this comment on Chaucer’s sources for “The Clerk’s Tale”: “The Clerk’s Tale” is a close translation of Petrarch’s Latin version of the story of Griselda, although Chaucer relied on a French translation of Petrarch as well. Petrarch had expanded the story from the final tale of Boccaccio’s Decameron , and his narrative became highly popular in the late fourteenth century. Petrarch wrote to Boccaccio about his interest in the story and also recorded the responses of some of his friends. (370) 2. What is Walter’s relationship with his people in Part I? What kinds of comparisons and contrasts can you make between the marriage of Walter and Griselda and the “marriage” of...
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Clerk's Tale - Chaucer English 315 The Clerk’s Prologue...

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