ADM1300_Final_Study_Notes[1]

ADM1300_Final_Study_Notes[1] - ADM1300 Final Study Notes...

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ADM1300 Final Study Notes Textbook Motivation Motivation: Psychological forces that determine the direction of a person’s behaviour in an organization, a person’s level of effort, and a person’s level of persistence. Intrinsically Motivated Behaviour: Behaviour that is performed for its own sake. Extrinsically Motivated Behaviour: Behaviour that is performed to acquire material or social rewards or to avoid punishment. Need: A requirement or necessity for survival and well-being. Needs Theories: Theories of motivation that focus on what needs people are trying to satisfy at work and what outcomes will satisfy those needs. Motivation equation Inputs from Organizational Performance Outcomes Received by Members Organizational Members Time, effort, education, Contributes to organiza- Pay, job security, benefits, experience, skills, knowledge, tional efficiency, effective- vacation time, job satisfac- work behaviours ness, and the attainment tion, autonomy, responsibility, of goals feeling of accomplishment, pleasure of doing interesting work Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs: An arrangement of five needs that, according to Maslow, motivate behaviour. Maslow proposed that the lowest level of unmet needs is the prime motivator and that only one level of needs is motivational at a time. Highest-level needs Self-actualization needs – realize one’s full potential Esteem needs – feel good about oneself, receive recognition Belongingness needs (social) – social interaction, love Safety needs – security, stability, safe environment Lowest-level needs Physiological needs – basic needs to survive (most basic or compelling) Herzberg’s Motivater-Hygiene Theory: A needs theory that distinguishes between motivator needs (related to the nature of the work itself) and hygiene needs (related to the physical and psychological context in which the work is performed). Herzberg proposed that motivator needs must be met in order for motivation and job satisfaction to be high. Hygiene Factors Motivators Relationship with supervisor and peers Achievement Personal life Recognition Salary Work itself Working conditions Responsibility Status Advancement Security Growth Extremely Dissatisfied Neutral Extremely Satisfied 1
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Process Theories: Theories of motivation that explore how one actually motivates someone. Expectancy Theory: The theory that motivation will be high when employees believe that high levels of effort will lead to high performance, and high performance will lead to the attainment of desired outcomes. Expectancy: In expectancy theory, a perception about the extent to which effort will result in a certain level of performance. Instrumentality: In expectancy theory, a perception about the extent to which performance will result in the attainment of outcomes. Valence: In expectancy theory, how desirable each of the outcomes available from a job or
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This note was uploaded on 01/07/2010 for the course TELFER ADM1300 taught by Professor Peterkoppel during the Fall '09 term at University of Ottawa.

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ADM1300_Final_Study_Notes[1] - ADM1300 Final Study Notes...

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