Chapter 10 - ©2004 by Nelson a division of Thomson Canada Limited 1 Chapter 10 Innovation and Change ©2004 by Nelson a division of Thomson Canada

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Unformatted text preview: ©2004 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 1 Chapter 10 Innovation and Change ©2004 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 2 What Would You Do? IBM must change Share of personal computer market was once 70 percent is now 7 percent How do you quickly and effectively create change? The strong corporate culture will likely produce resistance to change What would you do? ©2004 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 3 Learning Objectives: Organizational Innovation After reading the next two sections on organizational innovation, you should be able to: 1. explain why innovation matters to companies 2. discuss the different methods that managers can use to effectively manage innovation in their organizations ©2004 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 4 Why Innovation Matters Technology cycles Innovation streams ©2004 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 5 Technology Cycles Technology cycle starts with a new technology and ends when that technology reaches its limits and is replaced with better technology S-curve pattern of innovation a pattern of innovation characterized by slow initial progress, then rapid progress, then slow progress again as technology matures ©2004 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 6 Technology Cycle S-Curve Pattern of Innovation Exhibit 10.1 ©2004 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 7 Innovation Streams Patterns of innovation that can create sustainable competitive advantage Technological discontinuity Era of ferment Technological substitution Design competition ©2004 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 8 Design Competition Dominant design Incremental change ©2004 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 9 Managing Innovation Managing innovation during discontinuous change Managing innovation during incremental change ©2004 by Nelson, a division of Thomson Canada Limited 10 Managing Innovation During Discontinuous Change...
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This note was uploaded on 01/08/2010 for the course MGMT 2300 taught by Professor Thompson during the Spring '09 term at Nipissing.

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Chapter 10 - ©2004 by Nelson a division of Thomson Canada Limited 1 Chapter 10 Innovation and Change ©2004 by Nelson a division of Thomson Canada

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