prelim2review - REVIEWSESSION CHAPTERS610

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
REVIEW SESSION CHAPTERS 6-10
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 If you randomize your experiment properly, the  numerical values a variable assumes are  random variables.  Because a random variable refers to the outcome  of a random phenomenon, each possible outcome  has a specific probability of occurring.  The  probability distribution  of a random  variable specifies its possible values and their  probabilities. 
Background image of page 2
When a random variable has separate possible  values, such as 0, 1, 2, or 3 for the number of  heads in three flips of a coin, it is called  discrete. The probability of each discrete outcome is  between zero and one, and the sum of  probabilities across all discrete outcomes is one. Number of Goals  Probability 3 1/5 or .20 5 1/5 or .20 6 2/5 or .40 7 1/5 or .20 Probability  distribution of  number of goals in  a winning game for  Cornell Men’s  Hockey, ‘09-’10. What is the probability of scoring 6 or more goals in a winning game?
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
To describe probability distributions, we most often  use the mean and standard deviation. Summary measures for population distributions are  called  parameters , and are denoted by Greek letters  (μ, ). σ To find the mean of a probability distribution, we take  a weighted average. The mean of the probability  distribution is also called the  expected value . 3(.20) + 5(.20) + 6(.40) + 7(.20) 100 μ=
Background image of page 4
Anytime you have a distribution, you want to  know both its center and its spread. Larger  values for standard deviation denote more  variability. The standard deviation describes how  far the random variable falls, on average, from  the mean of its distribution. We’ll talk about how to calculate the spread of  probability distributions when we discuss each  distribution. 
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
We can also make probability distributions for  categorical variables if we denote success as 1  and failure as 0.  The mean for the probability distribution is the  same as before, except now the only term that  matters is the one associated with success, or 1. For random variables that have values 0 and 1,  the mean is the probability of the outcome  designated by 1.
Background image of page 6
Probability distributions also exist for continuous  random variables, with the user defining how  wide each bin of the histogram is.  Use continuous random variable probability  distributions to find the probability that  something falls within an interval (i.e., what’s  the probability that the next song on my iPod will  be between 3:45 and 4:15 in length?) Each interval has probability between 0 and 1  and is represented by the area under the curve. The interval containing all possible values has 
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/09/2010 for the course ILRST 2100 at Cornell University (Engineering School).

Page1 / 40

prelim2review - REVIEWSESSION CHAPTERS610

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online