Multiple Choice Answers

Multiple Choice Answers - 1.AcastaGneiss(Points:1)

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
1. Acasta Gneiss  (Points: 1)      Not withstanding the possibility that older rocks have been found at Porpoise  Cove, the oldest rocks that we, so-far, know of on Earth are from the Acasta  Gneiss complex in the Northwest Territories of Canada. Zircons within these  rocks have been dated to what age? a. 13.7 billion years b. about 4.4 billion years c. 4.54 billion years d . between 3.96 and 4.03 billion years e. 5730 years   Save Answer     2. Radioactive decay of potassium-40 into argon-40  (Points: 1)      40 K  (potassium-40) decays to  40 Ar  (argon-40) through nuclear capture of an  electron with a half-life of approximately 1.26 billion years. The oldest rocks  on Earth show ages of about 4 billion years. If a zircon crystal in these rocks  formed 4 billion years ago with 1000 atoms of  40 K , what would we expect the  ratio  40 Ar/ 40 K  to be within it today if it had not been since melted or otherwise  damaged?  1. almost  0/1  (little or no  40 Ar  left) 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
2. about  1/1  (ie., equal amounts of  40 Ar  and  40 K 3. about  3/1  (ie., 3X as much  40 Ar  as  40 K 4.  many more than  1000/1  (almost no  40 K  left) 5. about  7/1  (ie., 7X as much  40 Ar  as  40 K   Save Answer     3. Big Bang age  (Points: 1)      Our current best estimate for the time of the "Big Bang" moment is (Recall 1  billion years = 10 9  years in scientific numerical measure.): a. much less than 10 billion years ago. b. 13.73 ± 0.15 billion years ago. c . 4.54 ± 0.1 billion years ago. d. 4.03 ± 0.1 billion years ago. e. more than 20 billion years ago.   Save Answer     4. Elements formed in Big Bang  (Points: 1)      The original "Big Bang" explosion of the universe (choose one completion of  the sentence) 1. must have resulted from the collapse of a previous universe for, if not, we 
Background image of page 2
would not possess the rich chemistry beyond iron ( 56 Fe ) that we have on  Earth. 2. produced no "matter" at all, but spawned the "dark energy" which is still  pushing the universe apart. 3. produced all the chemical elements we know of within the first few  following seconds. 4. produced only "dark matter" which then decayed into the ordinary matter  we know of during the billions of years since the explosion. 5. produced vast quantities of only hydrogen ( 1 H 2 H ) and helium ( 3 He 4 He along with very small traces of lithium ( 7 Li ) and beryllium ( 6 Be 7 Be ) within the  first few seconds.  
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/09/2010 for the course EPSC 200 taught by Professor Jensen during the Winter '08 term at McGill.

Page1 / 61

Multiple Choice Answers - 1.AcastaGneiss(Points:1)

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online