Young Goodman Brown n4

Young Goodman Brown - After this journey he expects to live his life as he always had yet with a full realization that the faith in the individuals

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In the beginning he keeps on going because he is concerned to be caught, he then wishes to “take a cut through the woods until [they] have left [Goody Cloyse] behind. She might ask… and whither [he] was going” (paragraph 52). So, Goodman Brown embarks further and realizes that the Goody Cloyse chose “to go to the devil when [he] thought she was going to Heaven” (paragraph 39). Yet, after his disillusion of seeing his beloved Faith in the covenant, “And maddened with despair, so that he laughed loud and long, did Goodman Brown grasp his staff and set forth again at such a rate that he seemed to fly along the forest path rather than to walk or run” (paragraph 51). After that, he figures that Faith resides in good and evil places, that his actions alone will play the role for salvation. After all, the people who had taken part in the devil’s covenant were people, “of excellent repute…he recognized a score of the church members of Salem Village famous for their especial sanctity” (paragraph 55).
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Unformatted text preview: After this journey he expects to live his life as he always had, yet with a full realization that the faith in the individuals he trusted is lost; “Faith with the pink ribbons…almost kissed her husband before the whole village. But Goodman Brown looked sternly and sadly into her face and passed on without a greeting” (Paragraph 70). After such realization the chants were no longer meaningful because “an anthem of sin rushed loudly upon his ear” and “When the minister spoke from the pulpit with power and fervid eloquence…Goodman Brown turn pale, dreading lest the roof should thunder down upon the gray blasphemer and his hearers” (paragraph 72). In it all, Goodman Brown is not changing his way of life, yet his unwilling to accept the idea that salvation is behind a title, a religion, and a puritan way of life. From such realization, Goodman Brown expects to live in such fake society; “his dying hour was gloom” (paragraph 72)....
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This note was uploaded on 01/10/2010 for the course ENGLISH 12345 taught by Professor Handley during the Spring '09 term at Saddleback.

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