ADM1301_KBE III -- Innovation - Innovation,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–12. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Innovation, Commercialization, and the KBE Demands of the KBE: Increasing complexity of products and processes Increasing competition in an economy with shorter product lifecycles in which learning must be quicker An increase focus on the core competencies of the firm which have to be coordinated by letting go less relevant tasks Work done by a flexible workforce: a changing workforce that makes holding on to knowledge and transferring knowledge all the more difficult
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Importance of Knowledge Management in a Knowledge Based Economy (Source: Roelof P. vit Beijerse: Journal of Knowledge Management, Vol.3, No.2, 1999) Advantages of the KBE Improved efficiency Improved market position by operating more intelligently in the market Enhanced continuity of the company Enhanced profitability Improved competencies More efficient and effective learning Knowledge and technology alliances emerge Improved communication between knowledge workers Companies focus on core business and critical company knowledge
Background image of page 2
Innovation and Competitiveness in a Knowledge Based Economy A KBE survives and thrives on innovation, and innovation is driven by competition Hindsight is often instructive – consider the following quotes……
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Western Union Exec., 1876: “The telephone has too many shortcomings to be seriously considered as a means of communication”
Background image of page 4
Lord Kelvin, 1895: “Heavier-than-air flying machines are not possible”
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Prof. Marshall Foch, 1912: “Airplanes have no military value”
Background image of page 6
Thom Watson, IBM Chairman, 1943: “I think there is a world market for maybe 5 computers”
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Popular Mechanics, 1949 “Computers in the future may weigh no more than 1.5 tons”
Background image of page 8
Ken Olson (Digital), 1977: “There’s no reason for individuals to have a computer in their home”
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Bill Gates, 1981: “640,000 bytes of memory ought to be enough for anybody”
Background image of page 10
Innovation – What exactly is it? The preceding quotes demonstrate the development and
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 12
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 21

ADM1301_KBE III -- Innovation - Innovation,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 12. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online