Introduction to Corrections Unit 6 Teamwork

Introduction to Corrections Unit 6 Teamwork -...

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cci   Introduction to Corrections  CCJ2306 Instructor Susan Wind 2010 Introduction to Corrections E v e r e s t   O n - l i n e
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2 The Role of Capital Punishment in Contemporary Society; In the last 35 years, beginning with its temporary moratorium on the death penalty, the Supreme Court has changed its view of capital punishment and done so more than once; the majority of Americans, however, have not. (Copyright © 2010, The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life 1615 L Street, NW Suite 700 Washington, DC 20036-5610). During those 35 years, public support for the death penalty has experienced significant rises and dips, but surveys show that it has not fallen below 50% since 1966; for all that time, a substantial majority of Americans has favored the death penalty for persons convicted of murder. (Copyright © 2010, The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life 1615 L Street, NW Suite 700 Washington, DC 20036-5610). Surveys show that public support for the death penalty began an upward trend about the time the Supreme Court temporarily suspended capital punishment 35 years ago; support for the death penalty for persons convicted of murder gradually rose from 57% in late 1972 to a peak of 80% in 1994; in the late 1990s, the trend reversed and support receded for the remainder of the decade; since 2001, Pew Research Center surveys show support varying within a relatively steady, narrow range of 64% to 68%,(Copyright © 2010, The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life 1615 L Street, NW Suite 700 Washington, DC 20036-5610). While the number of Americans opposed to the death penalty for murder has ranged from 24% to 30%; in the most recent Pew survey, in late January 2007, 64% favored the death penalty for persons convicted of murder, 29% were opposed and 7% were unsure, (Copyright © 2010, The
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3 Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life 1615 L Street, NW Suite 700 Washington, DC 20036- 5610). A 2005 Pew poll found that among conservative Republicans, only 9% opposed the death penalty; opposition was highest among liberal Democrats, with 42% against the death penalty, (Copyright © 2010 The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life 1615 L Street, NW Suite 700 Washington, DC 20036-5610). Many people are against the death penalty because of their beliefs, an eye for an eye and that
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This note was uploaded on 01/11/2010 for the course CCJ-2306 1004 taught by Professor Susanwind during the Spring '09 term at Everest University.

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Introduction to Corrections Unit 6 Teamwork -...

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