The Era of Good Feeling

America: A Concise History, Volume 1: To 1877

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The Era of Good Feeling - 10 years after war of 1812 were years of good things for America - There was a new sense of patriotism/national pride. This was based on the success of the war of 1812, which they had won. They won the last battle. - Era of political stability and harmony. - There were no disputes between federalists and republicans. There was only one party: republicans. Why was there only one party? - The Federalist Party was dead. They were a pro-British party and they had opposed the war of 1812. The US won the war of 1812. So the Federalist Party as completely discredited. They were viewed by Americans as either foolish/useless for having opposed a successful war or as traitors for having opposed America in the war. - Federalists had no political credibility. Alien and Sedition acts didn’t help, but it was really the war of 1812 which dug them the hole. - The president at the time was James Monroe, during era of Good Feeling. - When he ran for reelection in 1820, he had no opponent. His was the only party. Federalists couldn’t even propose a candidate. - Economy - Suffered at end of War of 1812. For a few years, particularly manufacturers had done well because there were no imports from Britain during the war of 1812. And before the 1812, there was the Embargo Act. - For a number of years, US manufactures carried on with no competition. Normal times return at the end of the war, imports start from Britain and they face competition. -
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The Era of Good Feeling - The Era of Good Feeling 10 years...

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