Lecture 11

Lecture 11 - Horizontal seismograph Vertical seismograph...

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A model of the "earthquake weathercock" invented in 132 A.D. by the Chinese astronomer and mathematician Chang Heng. Eight dragons held bronze balls in their mouths. An internal mechanism, activated by even a slight tremor, opened the mouth of one dragon, releasing the ball to sound an alarm as it clanked into the open mouth of a metal toad below. Imperial watchmen determined the direction of the earthquake from the orientation of the empty-mouthed dragon. An Early Seismometer?
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Chang Heng and Seismoscope 132 A.D. Born 78 Died 139 China
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How a seismograph works (a) above Vertical seismograph (b) above Horizontal seismograph
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Borehole installation to reduce surface noise
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Unformatted text preview: Horizontal seismograph Vertical seismograph The suspended mass (yellow), sometimes called the inertial mass, tends to remain stationary during ground shaking. Vertical seismograph illustrating the principal of the inertial mass Horizontal seismometer in the form of a "garden gate" Sensor Transducer Seismometer Geophone Amplifier Digitizer Digital Recorder Computer Fixed securely to the ground; usually emplaced at some distance from the recording facility Often a radio, telephone, or satellite telemetry link May receive signals from dozens of remote sensors Kinematics Modern Seismograph Seismograms from a 3-component seismometer...
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This note was uploaded on 01/11/2010 for the course GEOL 240Lxg at USC.

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Lecture 11 - Horizontal seismograph Vertical seismograph...

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