phil12 - Brian Rhorer January 31, 2008 Phil 12 Jolley, S....

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Brian Rhorer January 31, 2008 Phil 12 Jolley, S. Prompt 2: The Apple Analogy In the first meditation, the Meditator decides to reject all of his beliefs that he has been forming since childhood, as he realizes that these falsehoods have clouded his entire body of knowledge . It is important to recognize that the Meditator and Descartes' opinions are one in the same, however the Meditator serves more as a guidance through the Meditations . The Meditator reasons that if he can doubt the foundations and basic principles of his knowledge, he will have to reject all of his opinions . He says that most of what he takes to be true has come from his senses, meaning his foundation of knowledge is his senses. However, he realizes that his senses can deceive him, and he uses the dream example to back up his assertion . The dreaming arguement works in a way that says we cannot use our senses to decide what is real and true, because when we dream we have sensations that feel as if they are real, so real in fact that we cannot tell the difference . Couldn't we suppose that when we think we are awake, we are actually dreaming . Therefore, the senses are called into doubt and the Meditator has reason to now reject all of his opinions he believed to be
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This note was uploaded on 04/03/2008 for the course PHIL 12 taught by Professor Jolley during the Winter '08 term at UC Irvine.

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phil12 - Brian Rhorer January 31, 2008 Phil 12 Jolley, S....

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