Econ434syllabus

Econ434syllabus - ECON434: Fall 2009 Section 001 MWF...

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E CON   434:    History of Economic Doctrines  * Fall 2009 Section 001 MWF 1:00-1:50 Davie 112 Ralph Byrns Gardner Hall 102 Department of Economics University of North Carolina Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3305 office Hours: MWF 2-3pm or appt * office phone: 919-843-9842 home: 919-933-8871 cell: 919-618-9993 (last resort) e-mail : [email protected] *NOTE : Formal and informal office hours are usually held in front of Gardner Hall. Please approach me anytime to discuss problems, or to chat. Use my landline # to call my home; cell reception where I live is awful. The Importance of Ideas: The ideas of economists and political philosophers, both when they are right and when they are wrong, are more powerful than is commonly understood. Indeed, the world is ruled by little else. Practical men, who believe themselves to be quite exempt from any intellectual influences, are usually the slaves of some defunct economist. Madmen in authority, who hear voices in the air, are distilling their frenzy from some academic scribbler of a few years back. I am sure that the power of vested interests is vastly exaggerated compared with the gradual encroachment of ideas…. But, soon or late, it is ideas, not vested interests, which are dangerous for good or evil….
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John Maynard Keynes "If I have seen further it is by standing on the shoulders of giants." Isaac Newton Quoted by Paul Samuelson Nobel Prize Ceremony, 1971 [ T ]he age of chivalry is gone. That of sophisters, economists; and calculators has succeeded; and the glory of Europe is extinguished forever. Edmund Burke (1790) Reflections on the Revolution in France It's easy to train economists. Just teach a parrot to say “Supply and Demand.” Thomas Carlyle This course addresses the development of economic ideas from ancient times to the present. You should gain insights into how profoundly past intellectual contributions have shaped contemporary economic thinking. In addition to mainstream perspectives on motives, behavior, and the organization of economic activity, this course will survey interpretations from some radical critics of capitalism, and the alternatives offered by other behavioral scientists. In addition to assigned texts, we will rely on some of the vast amounts of superb reading materials available on the web. Required Materials 1. History of Economic Thought , 4/ed. ( HET ) Landreth & Colander, Boston: Houghton-Mifflin, 2002. Link . [ Used = $98.35  and new = $131.15 @ UNC Student Stores , OR used = $117.05, new = $156.10 @ Tarheel Book & Supply, 119 E. Franklin St. OR used = $125.50; 2. The Worldly Philosophers , 7 th Edition, Robert Heilbronner ( WP ), NY: Touchstone Books, 1999. Link . [ Used = $13.75 ; new = $18 at UNC Student Stores , OR Used = $14; new = $18 at Ram Book & Supply.]
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3. Consolidated Class Notes , Ralph Byrns ( RTB ), Chapel Hill, NC: InteractiveEconomics.com, 2003- 2008. 4.
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2010 for the course ECON 434 taught by Professor Byrns during the Spring '09 term at UNC.

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Econ434syllabus - ECON434: Fall 2009 Section 001 MWF...

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