Econ434MC10A

Econ434MC10A - Topic 9: Institutionalism German Historicism...

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Institutionalism German Historicism 1. Alexander Hamilton’s advocacy of tariffs to protect “infant industries” was later echoed in the works of: (a) German historicists. (b) mercantilists. (c) American institutionalists. (d) David Hume. (e) French physiocrats. 2. The implicit assumptions of classical and neoclassical economic theorists that culture and historical time are irrelevant for useful economic analysis was most emphatically rejected by: (a) utilitarianianism. (b) German historicism. (c) mercantilism. (d) physiocracy. (e) logical positivism. 3. The German historical school had the most in common methodologically with: (a) American Institutionalism. (b) Austrian economics. (c) classical economics. (d) orthodox Marxism. 4. A school of thought that emphatically rejected the claim of neoclassical theorists that culture and historical time are irrelevant for useful economic analysis is: (a) utilitarianianism. (b) German historicism. (c) mercantilism. (d) physiocracy. (a) logical positivism. 5. Mercantilist doctrines assumed that balance of trade surpluses create national wealth. Alexander Hamilton argued that industrialization required protecting infant American industries from mature foreign competitors. Lou Dobbs asserts that immigration and the increasing globalization of economic activity harm blue-collar workers and middle- class Americans. Policies derived from the preceding sets of positions on international trade are most consistent with: (a) characterizations of bourgeoisie economic development written by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels in The Communist Manifesto . (b) François Quesnay’s theory of the circular flow of income. (c) the nationalism underpinning analyses by German historicists. (d) David Ricardo’s theory of comparative advantage. (e) the regulation of business practices advocated by John Rogers Commons. 6. Early developers of a theoretical rationale for American protectionism would include: (a) Thorstein Veblen and John R. Commons. (b) Richard Nixon and Spiro Agnew. (c) John Bates Clark and Irving Fisher. (d) Alexander Hamilton and Friedrich List. (e) John Philip Sousa and John Kenneth Galbraith. 7. At the end of the 19 th century American graduate students pursuing PhDs in economics abroad would have been most densely clustered in: (a) Austria. (b) Paris. (c) Germany. (d) Cambridge, England. (e) Sweden. 8. A famous debate about the relative merits of historical analysis versus abstract modeling featured arguments between: (a) Friedrich List and Antoine-Augustin Cournot. (b) Edwin Chadwick and Simon Newcomb. (c) Carl Menger and Gustav von Schmöller. (d) Karl Marx and John Stuart Mill. (e) Alfred Marshall and Vilfredo Pareto. American Institutionalism
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This note was uploaded on 01/12/2010 for the course ECON 434 taught by Professor Byrns during the Spring '09 term at UNC.

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Econ434MC10A - Topic 9: Institutionalism German Historicism...

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