neuron1.W09 - Lisa Garr That makes sense. .. multiple...

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the nervous system
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Efferent – from the brain Afferent – to the brain
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Organization of the nervous system central nervous system brain and spinal cord peripheral nervous system somatic system autonomic system
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Organization of the nervous system central nervous system brain and spinal cord peripheral nervous system somatic system muscle control information from muscles and skin autonomic system control of glands and “smooth” muscles (heart, stomach and intestines, etc.)
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Your Brain Lesson 1: We only use ten percent of our brain
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Your Brain Lesson 2: Don’t believe everything you hear.
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Dis-a-Myth
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Your Brain Neurons thinking your love life taking exams regulation of: eating respiration heart rate … Glial cells structural support repair insulation transmission speed house cleaning
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Physicists have only been able to account for 10 % of the universe. Scientists say that we only use 10% of our brains. The other 90% is contemplating the 90% of the universe that physicists cannot account for. Gregg Braden
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Unformatted text preview: Lisa Garr That makes sense. .. multiple sclerosis: degeneration of myelinated schwann cells Damaged neurons cannot regenerate dis-a-myth How does Neuron A talk to Neuron B? 1. Neuron B is resting (polarized, -70 mV) 2. Neuron B receives neurotransmitter from neuron A. 3. Neuron B becomes depolarized . If it is depolarized enough, it will fire (Action potential) 4. Neuron B returns to its polarized (resting) state. ACTION POTENTIAL IS ALL-OR-NOTHING no such thing as a small action potential. no such thing as a big action potential. but sub-threshold signals can sum together: spatial summation (from several neurons) temporal summation (from one neuron many times) Neurotransmitters Acetylcholine Norepinephrine Dopamine Serotonin GABA Glutamate Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors from botoxcosmetic.com Botox: Botulin Toxin Type A A relative of Botulism toxin which can kill you. Dont I look great with neurotoxins injected into my forehead?...
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This note was uploaded on 01/14/2010 for the course PSYCH 002 taught by Professor Clark during the Spring '09 term at UC Riverside.

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neuron1.W09 - Lisa Garr That makes sense. .. multiple...

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