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A SELECTION from the WRITINGS of GUY DE MAUPASSANTSHORT STORIES of the TRAGEDY AND COMEDY OF LIFEWITH A CRITICAL PREFACE BY PAUL BOURGET of the French AcademyAND AN INTRODUCTION BY ROBERT ARNOT, M.A.VOL. I {of III ??}TABLE OF CONTENTS.[*]VOLUME I.1. MADEMOISELLE FIFI2. AN AFFAIR OF STATE3. THE ARTIST4. THE HORLA5. MISS HARRIET6. THE HOLE7. LOVE8. THE INN9. A FAMILY10. BELLFLOWER11. WHO KNOWS?12. THE DEVIL13. EPIPHANY14. SIMON'S PAPA15. WAITER, A "BOCK"16. THE SEQUEL TO A DIVORCE17. THE MAD WOMAN18. IN VARIOUS ROLES19. THE FALSE GEMS20. COUNTESS SATAN21. THE COLONEL'S IDEAS22. TWO LITTLE SOLDIERS23. GHOSTS24. WAS IT A DREAM?25. THE DIARY OF A MADMAN26. AN UNFORTUNATE LIKENESS27. A COUNTRY EXCURSION[*] At the close of the last volume will be found a complete listof the French Titles of De Maupassant's writings, with their
English equivalents.GUY DE MAUPASSANTOf the French writers of romance of the latter part of thenineteenth century no one made a reputation as quickly as did Guyde Maupassant. Not one has preserved that reputation with moreease, not only during life, but in death. None so completelyhides his personality in his glory. In an epoch of the utmostpublicity, in which the most insignificant deeds of a celebratedman are spied, recorded, and commented on, the author of "Boulede Suif," of "Pierre et Jean," of "Notre Coeur," found a way ofeffacing his personality in his work.Of De Maupassant we know that he was born in Normandy about 1850;that he was the favorite pupil, if one may so express it, theliterary protege, of Gustave Flaubert; that he made his debutlate in 1880, with a novel inserted in a small collection,published by Emile Zola and his young friends, under the title:"The Soirees of Medan"; that subsequently he did not fail topublish stories and romances every year up to 1891, when adisease of the brain struck him down in the fullness ofproduction; and that he died, finally, in 1893, without havingrecovered his reason.We know, too, that he passionately loved a strenuous physicallife and long journeys, particularly long journeys upon the sea.He owned a little sailing yacht, named after one of his books,"Bel-Ami," in which he used to sojourn for weeks and months.These meager details are almost the only ones that have beengathered as food for the curiosity of the public.I leave the legendary side, which is always in evidence in thecase of a celebrated man,--that gossip, for example, which aversthat Maupassant was a high liver and a worldling. The very numberof his volumes is a protest to the contrary. One could not writeso large a number of pages in so small a number of years withoutthe virtue of industry, a virtue incompatible with habits ofdissipation. This does not mean that the writer of these greatromances had no love for pleasure and had not tasted the world,but that for him these were secondary things. The psychology ofhis work ought, then, to find an interpretation other than that
afforded by wholly false or exaggerated anecdotes. I wish to

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