me_350_-_lect_6_-_ch_21.20090910.4aa9b31b609e85.74823330

me_350_-_lect_6_-_ch_21.20090910.4aa9b31b609e85.74823330 -...

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ME 350 – Lecture 6 – Chapter 21 THEORY OF METAL MACHINING: Overview of Machining Technology Theory of Chip Formation in Metal Machining Force Relationships and the Merchant Equation Power and Energy Relationships in Machining Cutting Temperature
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As the chip is removed, a new surface is exposed Machining α =
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Machining Operations Most important machining operations: 1. Turning 2. Drilling 3. Milling Other machining operations: Shaping and planing Broaching Sawing
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Single point cutting tool removes material from a rotating workpiece to form a cylindrical shape 1. Turning Used to create a round hole, usually by means of a rotating tool (drill bit) with two cutting edges 2. Drilling
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Rotating multiple-cutting-edge tool is moved across work to cut a plane or straight surface Two forms: 3. Milling
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Cutting Tool Classification 1. Single-Point Tools Point is usually rounded to form a nose radius Example : 2. Multiple Cutting Edge Tools Motion relative to work achieved by rotating Examples :
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Cutting Conditions in Machining Material removal rate can be computed as M RR = where v = cutting speed ; f = feed ; d = depth of cut
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Roughing vs. Finishing Roughing - removes large amounts of material from starting workpart Close to desired geometry ( not to full depth ) Feeds and depths: Cutting speeds: Finishing - completes part geometry Final dimensions, tolerances, and finish Feeds and depths: Cutting speeds:
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