me_350_-_lect_11_-_ch_9.20090930.4ac4148810a113.80511384

me_350_-_lect_11_-_ch_9.20090930.4ac4148810a113.80511384 -...

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ME 350 – Lecture 11 – Chapter 9 COMPOSITE MATERIALS Components in Composite materials Composite Examples Fiber orientation Secondary phase examples Composite Strength
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Composite Advantages Strength‑to‑weight ratio and stiffness‑to‑weight ratios are several times greater than for steel or aluminum Fatigue properties are generally better than for common engineering metals Toughness is often greater Possible to achieve combinations of properties not attainable with metals, ceramics, or polymers alone.
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Disadvantages Properties are generally anisotropic (they differ depending on direction) May be an advantage or a disadvantage Can be weakened by chemicals or solvents Just as the polymers themselves are susceptible Generally expensive Manufacturing methods often slow
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Components in a Composite Material Most composite materials consist of two phases : 1. The primary phase within which the other phase is
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