me_350_-_lect_15_-_ch_16.20091015.4ad76b2426c880.27351339

me_350_-_lect_15_-_ch_16.20091015.4ad76b2426c880.27351339 -...

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ME 350 – Lecture 16 – Chapter 16 POWDER METALLURGY: 1. The Characterization of Engineering Powders 2. Production of Metallic Powders 3. Conventional Pressing and Sintering 4. Alternative Pressing and Sintering Techniques 5. Materials and Products for PM 6. Design Considerations in Powder Metallurgy
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Powder Metallurgy (PM) Usual PM production sequence: 1. – powders (alloys, lubricants, sizes, etc) 2. – powders are compressed into desired shape to produce Accomplished in press using punch-and-die tooling designed for the part 3. – green compacts are heated to bond the particles into a hard, rigid mass Performed at temperatures the melting point of the metal
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Why Powder Metallurgy is Important Main advantage: PM parts are produced to or , eliminating or reducing the need for subsequent machining PM process wastes very little material - ~ % of starting powders are converted to product Distinct characteristic: PM parts can be made with a specified level of , to produce porous metal parts Examples: filters, oil‑impregnated bearings and gears
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More Reasons Why PM is Important Certain metals that are difficult to fabricate by other methods can be shaped by powder metallurgy Tungsten filaments for incandescent lamp bulbs are made by PM Certain alloy combinations and cermets ( ) made by PM cannot be produced in other ways PM is similar to most casting processes in dimensional control
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Limitations and Disadvantages High tooling and equipment costs for die
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This note was uploaded on 01/15/2010 for the course ME 350 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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