me_350_-_lect_22_-_ch_30.20091112.4afcf4a9a1ae56.10078780

me_350_-_lect_22_-_ch_30.20091112.4afcf4a9a1ae56.10078780 -...

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FUNDAMENTALS OF WELDING 1. Overview of Welding Technology 2. The Weld Joint 3. Physics of Welding 4. Features of a Fusion Welded Joint ME 350 – Lecture 22 – Chapter 30
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Joining and Assembly Joining – examples: welding, brazing, soldering, and adhesive bonding Assembly – (although maybe not easy) examples: screws, bolts and nuts, pop-fitting, and compression fittings.
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Welding Permanent joining process in which two (or more) parts are coalesced at their contacting surfaces, called surfaces, by application of heat and/or pressure (welds can be heat alone with no pressure, or heat and pressure, or just pressure and no heat) In some welding processes a material is added to facilitate coalescence
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Limitations and Drawbacks of Welding Many welding operations are labor intensive Most welding processes utilize high energy and are inherently dangerous Welded joints do not allow for disassembly Welded joints can have quality defects that are difficult to detect Two types of welding: 1) Fusion welding 2) Solid state welding
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1) Fusion Welding Joining processes that the base metals In many fusion welding operations, a filler metal is added to the molten pool to facilitate the process and provide bulk and added strength to the welded joint A fusion welding operation in which no filler metal is added is called:
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Fusion Welding Examples Arc welding (AW) – melting accomplished by an electric arc to the workpiece Resistance welding (RW) ‑ melting accomplished by resistance to an electrical current between faying surfaces held together under pressure Oxyfuel gas welding (OFW) ‑ melting accomplished by an oxyfuel gas such as acetylene
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2) Solid State Welding Joining processes in which coalescence results
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This note was uploaded on 01/15/2010 for the course ME 350 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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