Scale_p - Measurement Scales If you cant measure it you...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–13. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
“If you can’t measure it, you can’t analyse it.” Alan Tse
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Kinsey On Love
Background image of page 2
Objectives To understand the nature and purpose of a scale. To look at various types of scales commonly used in questionnaires and their development. To study the validity and reliability of scales.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Conent Introduction Four Levels of a Scale Scaling Methods Some Common Scales Other Scaling Issues Validity Reliability
Background image of page 4
Measurement and Scaling Measurement means assigning numbers or other symbols to characteristics of objects according to certain pre-specified rules. One-to-one correspondence between the numbers and the characteristics being measured. The rules for assigning numbers should be standardized and applied uniformly.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Measurement and Scaling Selecting measurable phenomena Developing a set of mapping rules Applying the mapping rule
Background image of page 6
Characteristics of Measurement Purchase Intention 1. Definitely Yes 2. Likely 3. Neutral 4. Unlikely 5. Definitely No
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
THE MOST ACCURATE POLL WAS THE MOST UNORTHODOX MUFFIN POLL. The Muffin Poll, conducted at a bakery in Manchester in northern England, kept its record for 100 per cent accuracy, held since 1964. Muffins are dyed blue for sale to Conservative voters, red for Labour and yellow for the Liberal Democrats. Measurement and Scaling
Background image of page 8
Example: happiness vs productivity 1. Suicide rate. 2. A five point scale from very unhappy to very happy. Very often involves judgment, subjective rating. Measurement and Scaling
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Scales of Measurement Scales Nominal Scale Ordinal Scale Ratio Scale Interval Scale
Background image of page 10
Four Levels of a Scale Stevens (1946) identified four kinds of scales: 1. Nominal scale No order or distance relationship. No arithmetic origin. Only a limited number of statistics, all of which are based on frequency counts, are permissible, e.g., percentages, and mode. No generally used measure of dispersion.
Background image of page 11

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Four Levels of a Scale 1. Ordinal scale Horses coming in first second and third are clearly ranked 1,2 and 3 but the difference in times between 1 and 2 may certainly be different to that between 2 and 3. Transitivity: if a> b and b>c, then a
Background image of page 12
Image of page 13
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 01/15/2010 for the course MKT mkt3010C taught by Professor Alan during the Fall '08 term at CUHK.

Page1 / 37

Scale_p - Measurement Scales If you cant measure it you...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 13. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online