apparel - ' Retailer, $ 50 Manufacturer, $35 ( $22.50 for...

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' Retailer, $50 Manufacturer, $35 ($22.50 for labric) Contr8ctQ1, $15 [Workers, $6) ____________.___. ..----------- - w: mb& W- & ~JS, Mad-~n-hm- L Back UI SC$C.~~*~ Ftd, i I~BB, pp rrbra. hm from Kun Sllmon.mnrc$ Figure I. Thc Dimibutiin of du Pmceds of a $roo Dws traQor, and covers borb rhc cost of direfl labor and rhc contnctoh oher expenses, and profit. Ody 6 pcrcmt, $6, gm to thc pc~n who amdy sewed the pent. hd~crmore, dus individual was more than likelg havc ban paid by the number of sewing operations performed rhm by rhc hour and havc received no bcncfi~ any ldnd. Swarshops have indccd rerumcd m rhc Uoitcd Snta. A phmome- non the apparel industry considered long past is back, nor a5 a minor abmdoo, but as a prominem way doing business. Every once in a while, an apcually dramatic story hi= the news: Omp Counq f3m- gy is found sewing in their home, where a seven-ycar -old duid work next his morhcr. Thai workers in XI Monte are in an rpmcnr corn- plm, held against rhPu will under conditions sernienslavcmcnt while ~gsubmlnimum wages. Kathie 1xe Gifford, celebncy endorser a Wd-Mm Lbd, dscovcn hat her he being produced .swearshop< bd o&hore and the United Smres and cries shme on nationd tele- vision. The United Seare Depamftcnt Labor darelops a program to mrLe apparel rnanuhrmrcrs take responsibility for nvraahop violanons. The Prsidmt of rhe United States mblkhcs ~I~rApparel Industry Rrt- nersiup'~~ we if a so~uhon can bc found the powrh swuahops here andabroad. Themtian is bins a1.x7are that r)lc scourgc swear- shops has rmxncd. Sweatshops ht emerged in the Unircd Starcs induswy in the last dccadcs of the nineteenth centurn with the dcvcbpmcnr of the mass prdt~&rn garments in Nm lbrk City2 hignnr workers, mid? young women, slaved for long hours ovcr their swing machines cramped unsardtq factories, for very low 1l:orkcrs evcntu- ally reb&csd. In 1909 a major strike hy shmvaisr factory workers, ,mmc- time. calledtheuprising of the 20,000, ura thc first srrikc by women workers the United Sates. (Shi~ists, a style women's bomcn'sous~, were the fmt mass-produced fashion items.) It ~~ followed by strikes orher sectors of the industry. In I9rr infamous Triangle Shirtwaist facror?~ fire New York resultcd the dcaths of 146 young garmcnr workcrs, provoked public outmp. Wrpfzcd, militant, mind su pportd bv an aroused public, the workers founded chc garmcnc unions dcmanhd contracts that wa~rld protcct tl~cm againsr sweatshop produnion. New Dd legislation reinforced basic standards Iabor ior workcrs and pro- tcaed heir right to join or form independent unions. A combination of government prorccrion seong apparel unions hclped to relepte gar- ment sweatshops the margins chc indusrry mriI che ~g~os, when they bcgan to rcappcar. Inat cxaccly is a "su~earshop"! A sweatshop usually defined a fac- tory or a homework operation that engages in multiple violanous law, typidv the non-payment minimu1 or overtime wages and var- ious violations health safety regulations. Accoriling to this deh- idon, many of the prmcnt factories in Las hgeles are sweatshops. Xn a sample survey conducted by the United States Departn~ent Labt January 1998~61
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apparel - ' Retailer, $ 50 Manufacturer, $35 ( $22.50 for...

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