Midterm Image Review - MIDTERM REVIEW CLASSICS 340B Pozzo...

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MIDTERM REVIEW CLASSICS 340B
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Pozzo and Ziro Tomb, Villanovan - Archaic I and II 1000-675 B.C. These impasto-ware urns are biconical and contained the ashes of the dead.
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Etruscan Hut Urn (Villanovan), Tarquinia, 9 th century BCE, Terracotta- Archaic I These clay containers were used to contain the ashes of the dead and were modeled on contemporary structures.
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Hut dwellings
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Sepolcreto -ca. 1000 BCE-ca. 615 BCE. -cemetery in the forum -cremation and inhumation examples
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Wiry geometric style sculptures from Tarquinia and Vetulonia, Geometric Style 750-675 B.C.- Archaic II
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This piece shows advances in Etruscan sculpture, Compared to the wiry geometric figures, this shows a far more realistic style. The form is still geometric, but there is desire to portray a more natural body. Marsiliana Ivory ca. 650 B.C.- Archaic III Period- Early Etruscan, End of Villanovan Period
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Apollo of Veii, Etruscan, c. 500 BCE, painted terracotta, Veii Etruscans decorated their temple rooftops with terracotta figures. Although this was a unique tradition, it may show the influence of South Italy, where use of terracotta for architectural ornament was popular.
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Mars of Todi, Etruscan, Early 4 th century BCE, Bronze. Imitation of Greek Classical Style This statue is nearly life size and imitates the Greek Classical style. Here, the artist attempts to imitate contrapposto.
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Fibula, Etruscan, Second half of the seventh century BCE, Gold, from the Regolini-Galassi Tomb Fibulae are ornamental as well as functional: they act as large pins to clasp garments together. This is a particularly fine example and incorporates a technique known as granulation.
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Model sheep liver, Etruscan Sheeps livers were used by priests to determine fates. Abnormalities in different regions of the liver would indicate which God was active…
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Tumulus, Etruscan, These tumuli had corbeled arch entryways…
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Modern reconstruction of an Etruscan Temple. One of the most important early Etruscan temples was the Temple at Veii from about 500 BCE. It was constructed from wood, mud brick, and terracotta.
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Hunting birds and Fishing, Etruscan, from the Tomb of Hunting and Fishing, Tarquinia, late 6 th c. BCE, Wall Painting. In this example, figures are shown somewhat on a realistic scale. Bright colors are used and space is, as usual, filled as much as possible.
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Tomb of the Augurs, Cerveteri, Etruscan Tomb ca .530 BCE -depicts funerary games—Phersu
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Tomb of the Lionesses, Etruscan, Tarquinia, Wall Painting, 520-510 BCE. The female dancer in the tomb is shown with lighter skin than the male, which was typical of ancient wall paintings in Egypt, Greece, Rome, etc. The tomb itself is shaped like a house.
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Head of Velia, from the Tomb of Orcus, Etruscan, Tarquinia, 4 th century BCE, Wall Painting. Although this piece is from an Etruscan tomb, the
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Midterm Image Review - MIDTERM REVIEW CLASSICS 340B Pozzo...

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