Schmitz - I Hate All Common Things.pdf - Department of the...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 29 pages.

Department of the Classics, Harvard University "I Hate All Common Things": The Reader's Role in Callimachus' Aetia Prologue Author(s): Thomas A. Schmitz Source: Harvard Studies in Classical Philology, Vol. 99 (1999), pp. 151-178 Published by: Department of the Classics, Harvard University Stable URL: . Accessed: 12/09/2013 16:21 Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at . . JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range of content in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new forms of scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected] . Department of the Classics, Harvard University is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Harvard Studies in Classical Philology. This content downloaded from 157.92.4.6 on Thu, 12 Sep 2013 16:21:44 PM All use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions
"I HATE ALL COMMONTHINGS": THE READER'S ROLE IN CALLIMACHUS' AETIA PROLOGUE * THOMAS A. SCHMITZ WHEN in 1928 a papyrus discovered in the Egyptian town of Oxyrhynchus revealed large portions of the prologue to Calli- machus' Aetia, critics immediatelyrecognized that this text was one of the most important of all of Hellenistic poetry. Accordingly, it has attracted the attention of a great number of interpreters.' A large por- tion of this interest, however, has concentrated on historical and bio- graphical problems rather than on the text itself. This interpretative emphasis was already apparent in antiquity.Fragments of an ancient commentary on a papyrus now in Florence (PSI 1219), the so-called "Florentine scholia," show that ancient scholars tried to identify the opponents whom Callimachus designated under the name of Telchines (3-9). Moderncritics have followed suit, and a disproportionate amount of scholarly work has concentrated on the question of who these envi- ous and evil creatures were. It was widely assumed that the names given in the Florentine scholia were those of epic poets. Epic poetry, * Earlier versions of this paper were given at Harvard University and the University of Washington at Seattle. I wish to thank all those who participated in the discussion and helped me get a clearerview of some of the issues involved. My thanks are especially due to A. Henrichs, Sir Hugh Lloyd-Jones, and R. F Thomas. Madeleine Gogh helped me correct the English. 1The lively scholarly discussion which followed the discovery of the papyrus has been described by G. Benedetto, II Sogno e l'Invettiva: Momenti di Storia dell' Esegesi Callimachea (Florence 1993 [Pubblicazioni dell' Istituto di Filologia Classica dell' Uni- versith di Milano 4]) 1-26.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture