Hollis - Callimachus Aetia Fr. 1.9-12.pdf - Callimachus...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 6 pages.

Callimachus, Aetia Fr. 1.9-12Author(s): A. S. HollisSource: The Classical Quarterly, New Series, Vol. 28, No. 2 (1978), pp. 402-406Published by: Cambridge University Presson behalf of The Classical AssociationStable URL: .Accessed: 12/09/2013 16:19Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at..JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact [email protected].Cambridge University Pressand The Classical Associationare collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserveand extend access to The Classical Quarterly. This content downloaded from 157.92.4.6 on Thu, 12 Sep 2013 16:19:56 PMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions
CALLIMACHUS, AETIA FR. 1.9-12 My main purpose is to propose a new supplement at the beginning of line 10, but, in so doing, one can not avoid discussing 11-12 as well. First, then, 9-10: &XX' KaOX[[KEc ....Tno]XL r?v paKpijv 6pivuta Oeoupo'6po[q 'but fruitful Demeter far outweighs the long ?' Both KaOd-Ket and rnokXi are guaranteed by the London scholia (Pfeiffer vol. i, p.3), so the gap is reduced to the tantalizingly small one of a monosyllabic feminine noun in the accusative case, most probably of four letters.' The number of possibilities cannot be unlimited. My own suggestion must necessarily remain in limbo in the present state of our knowledge concerning the poet or poets whom Callimachus is talking about, but at least it seems to me less bizarre than other restorations currently in the field. When A. S. Hunt published P. Oxy. vol. xvii, no. 2079 in 1924, Housman's 6pbv occupied this space, and the editor paraphrased 'Corn is much better than acorns, though they grow on a tall tree'. This was both coherent and comprehen- sible: the lofty oak represents mankind's primitive diet of acorns, and Demeter the later diet of corn, which, though not standing so tall, was far superior. But Housman did not yet have before him the Florentine scholia on this passage (Pfeiffer, vol. i, p.3), according to which Callimachus 7raparniOerat v ovy~,KpCoet rd 6lywv oriXCwv 6vra nrot~para Mtpvdppov 70o KoXhowviov Kai chiXra 0rob Kw'ov peXrtiova rCoV noiroXvu'owv abr7 (Cv)2 i)uWaKWcv eivat. Curiously enough, W. M. Edwards did not know the Florentine scholia either, when he first suggested (CQ 24 (1930), 110) that dOpEtwa Gcupoo6poq denotes Philetas' elegiac poem Demeter. Although many of Edwards's ideas now look wild, his reference to the Demeter is generally accepted. By chance we know that Philetas mentioned the very rare Attic word d1nrvCtoC in his lexicographical writings (see Pfeiffer on Call.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture