W._R._Paton - Greek Anthology IV (Book 10-11-12).pdf -...

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PregcuteJ) to ot tbe mnivereit^ of Toronto bB Bertram m. Bavis from tbe boohs of tbe late Xtonel Bavis, 1k.C.
THE LOEB CLASSICAL LIIHIARY EDllTSU BY M. CAFPH, rii.D., LL.D. T. E. PAGB, Lnr.l\ W. H. U. UuL'SK, LnT.i\ tup: greek anthology IV
THE (;reek anthology. VOLt'ME I. CHRISTIAN KPIGRAM8. CHRISTOiJCJaU.S OF THEBE.S IN EUVn'. THE CYZICBNE EPIGUAMS. THE I'HOEMS OF THE DIFPEKEM' AS- TfKJl.OGIES. THE AMATORY ElMGRAMS. TlIK PEDICATORV EPIGRAMS. Volume II. SK I' L I.C H RAL EPIGRAMS. THK EPIGRAMS OF SAINT (JHEGOHY THE THEOLOGIAN. Voi.li.MK 111 THE DECLAMATORY EPiOli.VMS.
THE GREEK
CONTENTS PACiE iJOOK X. -TIIK HOKTATORV AND ADMONITOKY EPKiKAMS 1 BOOK XI. THK CONVIVIAL AND SATIRICAL Kl-KiliAMS . G7 BOOK Xli. STRATO'S ilCKi 1'LKHU.Hi 280 GENERAL INDEX 417 INDi:X OF AUTHORS INCLUDED IN THIS VOLUME .... 420
GREEK ANTHOLOGY BOOK X THE HORTATORY AND ADMONITORY EPIGRAMS The first seventeen epigrams in this book, some very pretty, are chiefly addresses to harbour gods derived from all three of the main sources of the Anthology. We have next, with some epigrams from Agathias' Cycle and some others inserted, a large collection of the epigrams of Palladas of Alexandria, a versiiier as to whose merit there is much difference of opinion, but who is at least interesting as the sole poetical representative of his time and surroundings (Nos. 18-99). Then we have (100-103) a short fragment of Philippus' Stephanus, and then a miscellany mostly not of epigrams but of verse extracts from literary sources.
ANGOAOriA I EnirPAMMATA DPOTPEnTIKA 1.— AEHNIAOT 'O 7r\oo9 6ipalo<i' koX yap XaXayevaa ^eXiSuiv rjhr] /jii/ji0Xa)K€V, x^ %ayot6t9 'Zie<pvpo<i' XeifiMva 5' avdevcTL, aeai'yqKev he OaKaacra Kvpiacn KoX rprj^el Trvevfiari ^paa-ao/Mept). ayKvpa<i aveXoio, koI ixXvaaio yvaia, vavTiXe, Koi 7rXu>oi<; irdaav i(f)el<; oOovrjv. ravff" 6 YlpirjiTO^ iyoov eTnTeXXo/jiai o Xiju,€VLTa<i, Mvdpaxf)^, CO? TrXcoot? irdcrav €7r' efMTropiijv. Goldwin Smith in Wellesley's Anthologia Polyglotta, p. 49 ; J. A. Pott, Oreeh Love Sonys and Epigrams, i. p. 32 ; H. C. Beeching, In a Garden, p. 96. 2.— ANTinATPOT SIAHNIOT 'A/c/iato? poOirj vr)t 8p6fio<i, ovSk ddXaaaa 7rop(fivp€i rpofiep^ (ppiKt '^(apaaaofievri' rjSr} Be irXdaaei jxev vTToopo^a yvpd 'X^eXiBcov olKia, XeifMcovcov 3' djBpd yeXa TreraXa.
GREEK ANTHOLOGY BOOK X THE HORTATORY AND ADMONITORY EPIGRAMS 1.— LEONIDAS It is the season for sailing ; already the chattering swallow has come, and the pleasant Zephyr, and the meadows bloom, and the sea with its boiling waves lashed by the rough winds has sunk to silence. Weigh the anchors and loose the hawsers, mariner, and sail with every stitch of canvas set. This, O man, I, Priapus, the god of the harbour, bid thee do that thou mayst sail for all kinds of merchandise. 2.— ANTIPATER OF SIDON It is the season for the ship to travel tearing through the waves ; no longer does the sea toss, furrowed by dreadful fret.

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