APUSH Unit 3 Chapter 9.pdf - Chapter 9 The Confederation and Constitution Key Terms Articles of Confederation Definition \u25cf first American constitution

APUSH Unit 3 Chapter 9.pdf - Chapter 9 The Confederation...

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Chapter 9 : The Confederation and Constitution Key Terms Definition Articles of Confederation first American constitution that established the United States as a loose confederation of states under a weak national Congress Not granted the power to regulate commerce or collect taxes. No executive branch (Anti-England) States rule and create their own constitutions They were replaced by a more efficient Constitution in 1789 Constitution Basic : Separation of Powers - Executive, Legislative, Judicial Checks and balances, bill of rights (first 10 amendments to constitution) Old Northwest territories acquired by the federal government from the states, encompassing land northwest of the Ohio River, east of the Mississippi River and south of the Great Lakes well-organized management and sale of the land in the territories under the land ordinances of 1785 and 1787 established a precedent for handling future land acquisitions. Land Ordinance of 1785 provided for the sale of land in the Old Northwest and earmarked the proceeds toward repaying the national debt Northwest Ordinance created a policy for administering the Northwest Territories. It included a path to statehood and forbade the expansion of slavery into the territories. Problems with English in Great Lakes and Spain on Mississippi River Pirates in the Mediterranean Shay’s Rebellion (Fall 1785) armed uprising of western Massachusetts debtors seeking lower taxes and an end to property foreclosures. Small, poor farmers rising up with Daniel Shays Moment when more states see problems with Articles Though quickly put down, the insurrection inspired fears of "mob rule" among leading Revolutionaries. Virginia Plan "large state" proposal for the new constitution calling for proportional representation in both houses of a bicameral Congress. The plan favored larger states and this prompted smaller states to come back with their own plan for apportioning representation. New Jersey Plan "small-state plan" put forth at the Philadelphia convention proposing equal representation by state, regardless of population, in a unicameral legislature. Small states feared that the more populous states would dominate the agenda under a proportional system Great Compromise popular term for the measure which reconciled the New Jersey and Virginia plans at the constitutional convention, giving states proportional representation in the House and equal representation in the Senate.
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