AP Gov Unit 3 - Political Participation.pdf - Chapter 8 Political Participation A Close Look at Nonvoting \u2605 People who are able to vote are in the

AP Gov Unit 3 - Political Participation.pdf - Chapter 8...

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Chapter 8: Political Participation A Close Look at Nonvoting People who are able to vote are in the voter age population meaning they have reached minimum age requirements These exclude noncitizens, prisoners, and disenfranchised felons and are called voter eligible population USA elects more officials than many other countries and this could lead to why it has a lower voter turnout People also don’t vote because they may have conflict on that day or they fail to register to vote Motor Voter Law (1993) makes it easier for someone to register when they receive their license Get out the vote efforts increase participation like public record and informing neighbors of participation The Rise of the American Electorate When the constitution was ratified, only white property owners could vote but then slowly other groups were able to vote Suffrage to women, African Americans, 18 year olds, and direct election of senators 15 Amendment - people could not be discriminated because of their race, color, servitude There were efforts to exclude African Americans like literacy tests, poll taxes, and the grandfather clause Who Participates in Politics? Participation comes in the form of involvement with a campaign or attending community meeting but is costly requiring time, money, and interest in government Six Forms of Participation 1. Inactive - 22% rarely vote, do not get involved or talk about politics, little education, low incomes, and usually young 2. Activists - 11% highly educated, high incomes, middle aged and participate in all types of politics 3. Voting Specialists - vote but do little else, decent schooling and income and older than most 4. Campaigners - vote and are involved in campaign activities, better educated with clear identification with party and willingness to take positions 5. Communalists - do not like tension or conflict with partisan campaigns, join local organizations to solve problems 6. Parochial Participants - don’t vote and stay out of elections but are willing to contact officials on problems
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Factors that drive participation Citizens need resources to participate in politics like time, money, and civics skills Time to be politically active, money to donate, and civic skills like communicating Those with more education have higher incomes and have better skills Education fosters civic norms in students and help them realize participation matters Being mobilized helps get more people out the door Having a political party and campaigns help, some religious institutions Already voting before creates a habit that will be done again Deep concern about particular issues Community problems may influence someone to participate for their community Experience with government programs
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Chapter 9: Political Parties What Is a Party?
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  • Fall '19
  • Test, Coalition government, International Democrat Union, Politics of the United States

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