LING304 Notes 2-05

LING304 Notes 2-05 - Phonological Analysis Notes 2/05/2008...

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Phonological Analysis Notes 2/05/2008 Next week: class moves to DSH 228! We worked out that with speakers of Canadian French, dental stops become affricates when in the presence of high front vowels. The lexical representation is what the speaker remembers about the word. The problem is that everyone are literate, and think of words as how they are spelled. This may be easier in languages that you know nothing about. You need to do the same thing with familiar languages too. In french [tʊt] SAMPA([tUt]) ʼallʼ d-dz [tsɪm] SAMPA(tsIm) ʼteamʼ Predictable Unpredictable Idiosyncratic Information that is idiosyncratic is what differentiates one word from another. It is predictable that we get an affricate in [tsɪm]. On the other hand, the fact that it ends with [m] is not predictable.
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Both lexical representatives include a t because people consider it to be spelled that way, even if one is pronounced as an affricate. It is not predictable if one of the words started with another sound. In english, [tʰθl] SAMPA([t_hTl]) /tɪl/ SAMPA(/tIl/)
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LING304 Notes 2-05 - Phonological Analysis Notes 2/05/2008...

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