marketing proj

marketing proj - Snap Crackle Pop Some may think that these...

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Snap! Crackle! Pop! Some may think that these words are just part of some catchy phrase. Three words with no serious meaning or value. But there is more then meets the eye. These three words are part of a very expensive marketing campaign produced by the Kellogg Company for their very popular cereal Rice Krispies. In fact, in the year of 2000, Kellogg was forth on the list of the leading food advertisers on cable television with $14,585.50 thousand dollars. Kellogg’s Rice Krispies is a toasted rice cereal that comes in the very recognizable blue box. The product is well recognized by their trademark characters known as Snap!, Crackle!, and Pop!, the three pint size elf creatures that help sell boxes of the cereal in over 160 countries. History of the Company While working for his brother Dr. John Kellogg, at Battle Creek, Michigan’s famous medical facility, Will Keith (W.K.) Kellogg made flakes of wheat for the first time. For patients’ diets, the two men were experimenting with grains, when they suddenly got interrupted. When they finally returned, water had absorbed into the dough. They accidentally created the first flaked cereal by toasting the result of the dough. In 1899, in 1
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a partnership managed by W.K., he made the flakes for his own firm in 1906. With his progressive and new marketing ideas, W.K. and his Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company claimed the top spot over 42 competing cereal companies in Battle Creek, including one ran by C. W. Post. He managed to increase the demand for the corn flakes from 33 cases a day in early 1906 to 2,900 a day by year end by posting an ad in Ladies Home Journal in that year. With all the success, W.K. introduced more cereal products including Bran Flakes in 1915, All-Bran in 1916 and Rice Krispies in 1928. Expansion to international markets first began in Canada in 1914, followed by Australia in 1824 and England in 1938. In 1964, the company introduced the Pop-Tart and in the 1970’s they acquired Eggo Waffles to diversify their product line. By the early 1980’s, General Mills and other rival cereal makers were giving Kellogg’s fierce competition, which resulted in a drop in its U.S. market share. To compensate, Kellogg’s introduced new cereals aimed for the adult target market and pursued the fast growing European market very strongly. Kellogg spent the mid-1990’s turning around the company. It sold its less important assets, which were its Argentine snack-foods maker, and it’s carton container. It also created the USA Convenience Foods Division. 2
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In 1997, and 1998, Kellogg began to focus on selling its products to more international markets including Australia, Asia, Latin America and the United Kingdom. It also released 25 percent of its salaried workforce in North America and increased the price on two-thirds of its cereals. Cuban-born president and COO Carlos Gutierrez became CEO after several top officers left in 1998 and 1999. Recent Company News
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marketing proj - Snap Crackle Pop Some may think that these...

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