Lecture 6 - Monotheletism and the Church in the Seventh century or, A Bluffer�s Guide to Chr

Lecture 6 - Monotheletism and the Church in the Seventh century or, A Bluffer�s Guide to Chr

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History 205 Byzantium: Imperial Age February 7, 2007 Lecture 6 – Monotheletism and the Church in the Seventh Century or, a Bluffer’s Guide to Christology Monotheletism – The idea that Christ only has one will Christology – The study of Christ o Who he was o What he was all about o Divine or human o Etc. In the study of church history, two big Christological questions: o 1. Who is Christ in relation to God? (major question of the 4 th century) Is he the same as God? Is he an angel? Etc. o Ecumenical Council – A council made up of Bishops from around the world o 325 – Council of Nicea o 381 – Council of Constantinople Nicea and Constantinople decide that Christ is equal to God o Lex credendi – rule of faith How people believe in their religion o Lex orandi – rule of prayer How people practice their religion o 2. How does the human and the divine relate to one another in Christ? (5 th century) The councils decide that Jesus is 100% human and 100% god at the same time, but they disagree how this is possible At this time, people didn’t believe that salvation could be achieved by believing that Christ died for you sins. Instead, people believed that the reincarnation brought salvation. If Jesus didn’t become human, you couldn’t be saved. 428 - Nestorios is made Bishop of Constantinople o He is originally from Antioch A debate arises whether to call Mary Theotokos (mother of God) or anthropotokos (mother of human) o Nestorios says to call her Christotokos (mother of Christ) Impassibility of Christ – a Christian doctrine from the 3 rd century that Christ is unchanging; his will is always the same o Contrary to Pagan beliefs where gods can change their wills Saying Theotokos implies that God can have a mother or God can be born Communication of Idioms/
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